Archives for July, 2011

Dogs 101: Chihuahua

Chihuahuas are the smallest breed in the world and love to be pampered.

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Randa

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Jul 31, 2011 | 0 | Dog breed information

A Home Made Dog Food Recipe Of Your Own

By Glenn Huey

Can you really make a difference in the health and wellbeing of your dog by providing a home made dog food recipe of your own?

Well, the answer is a resounding ‘yes’. All it takes is a little research and you could very easily do much, much better than anything provided by the commercial pet food industry.

I won’t go into it too far here since the facts about the lack of quality and the reality of actual danger to pets from feeding them commercial pet foods is very well documented in abundance in print and on the net. However, it’s safe to say that, with a little homework about what dogs need to eat and what dogs should never eat, it will be very easy to provide perfect nutrition for your dog.

You don’t need to spend any money for special foods or special equipment. You will probably want to have some kind of guidelines to follow about the kinds and quantities of macro and micro nutrients your dog needs and the foods that they can be found in.

I would very much recommend that you bring your dog to the vet and see what they can tell you about your dog’s physiology concerning foods. Some foods are known toxins to dogs and it’s possible that your dog may have food allergies. This is important information that you will want to have.

Some compelling reasons why you would want to do this for your dog:

• Your dog hasn’t had a healthy meal since it was weaned.

• It’s the reason that your dog seems underweight, smaller and weaker than most dogs of its breed and age.

• All dogs love to run and jump and play, but yours just doesn’t seem to be able to keep up or show any interest.

• Your dogs coat doesn’t look as nice as it could.

• Dogs that are fed only or mostly commercial dog foods recover from injury or illness a lot slower and are likely to die sooner than other dogs of its breed that are eating healthier meals and getting more exercise.

There are more reasons; but these are the ones you can see with your own eyes and be able to judge from this whether you should take on the responsibility of personally seeing to it that your dog is getting the very best quality food from your own home made dog food recipe files.

You don’t need to be concerned about extra costs for things like foods you don’t already buy or expensive food processing equipment you don’t already have. My dog owner costs have actually dropped. I can make my own food cheaper than I can buy it and I don’t spend as much money on my veterinarian these days.

It’s a little harder to keep up with Pepper now and that’s for sure; but, I need the extra exercise anyway. It only took him a few months to teach me that I needed to change my diet and fitness practices, too.

Glenn Huey has been an enthusiastic dog owner for over 50 years. He is sharing all he has learned on his website ‘Dog Food Recipes Home’. For more great information on ingredients in dog food visit http://www.dogfoodrecipeshome.com/ingredients-in-dog-food/

Be sure and sign up for the FREE 10 Part Mini-eCourse. You will find plenty of information that will improve your dog’s health, vitality and life span.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Glenn_Huey

 

 


Randa

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Jul 30, 2011 | 0 | Dog nutrition

Which Dog Shampoo Is Right for Rover?

By Cathy Forcier

Choosing the right Dog Shampoo can make a world of difference. Searching local stores and online for Dog shampoo for Rover can be overwhelming. Just like humans, choosing the right kind for your dogs skin type varies from dog to dog. The most common skin types are dry flaky skin, oily skin and normal skin. Which type of dog shampoo should Rover use?

1. DRY FLAKY SKIN

First look and see if Rover has dry flaky skin. If you see flakes, the best dog shampoo for the dry skin is one with an Oatmeal base. The oatmeal will clear up flakes, sooth dry itchy skin and moisturize. Always read the label on how to properly use the shampoo. One reason Rover might have dry flaky skin is because some less expensive dog foods don’t have the correct amount of ingredients for their skin. Try putting omega fatty acids in their meal. You can purchase a specific dog supplement with omega. Another option could be to give fish oil to help with his coat.

2. OILY SKIN

Rub your fingers through Rover’s fur and see if there is any type of oil residue. This will help you decipher if the coat is oily. When the coat has oily skin use a refreshing Dog shampoo to clean his coat. You will not want to use any type of conditioner. Conditioner will make Rovers skin feel more oilier.

3. NORMAL SKIN

Check to see if Rover has any dry flaky skin or if you can feel if the skin is oily. If he has neither you can choose a basic dog shampoo. One option is a Deodorizing shampoo. This will get ride of Rovers unwanted smells.

4. FLEAS AND TICKS SHAMPOO

Shampoo for fleas and ticks contain a chemical to kill the fleas and ticks but is safe to use on Rover. Make sure you read the label before applying to see how long you will need to leave the shampoo on. Make sure you rinse all the flea and tick shampoo out. This will help prevent ingestion if Rover grooms himself.

5. DOG CONDITIONER

Conditioners are great for dogs with long coated fur that gets tangles and mats. One type of conditioner for after shampooing dogs is a Deodorizing conditioner. This will get the smell out of Rovers skin. Another type is a creme rinse conditioner which makes their fur thicker. Make sure you rinse all of it out of your dogs coat. Don’t over condition this will make the coat look greasy.

6. NEVER USE HUMAN SHAMPOO

The PH in human shampoo is not balanced for dogs. The PH in Dog shampoo is made to remove odors, dirt, oil and has non tearing formula so it won’t burn Rovers eyes. Human shampoo will make Rovers skin dry and irritated.

Use the steps so you can decipher the right type of skin Rover has to get the correct Dog Shampoo. While giving Rover a bath, make it fun and a positive experience for him. I’m sure you will have fun getting wet with him. You can find a variety of dog shampoo at a local store or online. If you have any questions on which type to use for Rover please contact your veterinarian. They will help you decide which dog shampoo is best for Rover to use.

Cathy Forcier wants to thank you for taking the time to read this article. I hope you have benefited on the ways to choose the correct type of Dog Shampoo. I find that shampooing dogs with the right type of shampoo with give my dog the most beautiful coat. Please visit http://www.mydogshampoostore.com and see the items we offer for you and Rover. I’m sure Rover will love them.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Cathy_Forcier

Randa

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Jul 29, 2011 | 0 | Uncategorized

Dog Grooming Basics

By John Stackson

Knowing how to properly groom your dog at home can save you time, money and the hassle of a dog feeling uneasy being around someone else. There are some very basic guidelines to follow when grooming your dog at home. We will discuss specifically just the ears and teeth.

Let’s start with the ears. The maintenance on your dog’s ears is very easy. The ears should be checked weekly for insects, bugs, parasites and any open wound. The inside of an ear is an easy place for a bug to nest, which will obviously cause issues for your dog and can lead to pain. There are different cleaners you can buy from pet stores for the inside of your dog’s ears. Check with your vet to ensure you are buying the correct cleanser.

Gently clean the inside of the ear with a cotton ball. You never want to use a Q-Tip because if your dog unexpectedly moves, the Q-Tip could get lodged in its inner ear and cause some permanent damage. A cotton ball is much gentler on the dog. Cleaning the ear gets out ear wax, odors, prevents infection and can help heal lesions. There are certain dog breeds that must get their ear hairs plucked, such as Shih-Tzus. Talk to your vet or do some research to make sure you’re properly handling your dog’s ear grooming.

For as low maintenance as ear cleaning is, cleaning your dog’s teeth is even easier. Just like humans, dogs need their teeth to be watched after and taken care of daily. It is very easy for pet owners to incorporate teeth cleaning into everyday activities for a dog. Although most dogs don’t like getting their teeth brushed, some don’t mind it. Your vet can recommend the best type of toothpaste and brush to use on your dog’s breed. The more you brush your dog’s teeth, the more used to it they will get.

In addition to brushing your dog’s teeth, there is an array of dog treats designed specifically to help keep your dog’s teeth clean. There are many different types of denta-bone type treats, bones, and toys for your dog. If you find that your dog is reluctant to getting his teeth brushed, you might try giving him some treats designed to keep his teeth cleaned instead, and maybe brush his teeth fewer times a month. If you feel that brushing less could be damaging to your dog’s health, ask your vet what the best possible route to go would be.

If you are looking for an Aurora dog groomer, there are many great places to choose from. I would recommend checking out Club Pet Resorts. They offer full grooming, daycare and boarding for cats and dogs. For more grooming tips, check out the blog: Denver Grooming.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=John_Stackson

Randa

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Jul 28, 2011 | 0 | Dog grooming

Is Your Dog A Digger?

By Joanne Curtis

Are you tired of your dog digging in your flower beds, or making holes in the back yard?
Are you at the end of your rope and don’t know what to do? Unfortunately, some breeds of dogs have a natural instinct to dig, this makes it even more difficult to stop them. Some dogs, do it for fun. There could be several reasons why your dog digs.

1. His environment lacks playmates or toys.
2. They may also dig to provide shelter for themselves from cold, wind or rain.
3. He may see you digging to plant flowers or a garden.
4. If your dog digs in your presence, he is usually digging for your attention.
5. Dogs will dig a hole to hide their favorite toy or bone.
6. If your dog digs along the fence line or under the fence, he may be trying to escape to get somewhere, or something.
7. If there already is a hole, he will dig it deeper.
8. A puppy (under 3 years old) who doesn’t have outlets for his energy.
9. He’s left alone in the yard for too long without interaction with his human family.

It isn’t easy to get your dog to stop digging. But, lets take a look at some recommendations.

1. Leave your dog indoors while you are planting a garden or flowers, so he won’t see you digging and emulate you.
2. Walk your dog at least twice daily. This will help get rid of some of his energy.
3. Another good energy burner, is to teach your dog to fetch a ball and playing with him as often as possible.
4. Be sure there are no holes around your fence or by your gates for him to dig deeper to escape through.
5. Keep fun toys in the yard to keep him busy when you’re not around. Change the toys often.
6. If your dog continues to dig, provide him with his own area. Perhaps keep his toys in that area. When he digs somewhere else, tell him “No digging” and redirect him to his designated area.
7. There are cooling dog beds and heating dog beds you can provide your dog with, depending on the weather conditions.

All in all, it is definitely a challenge to get your pet to stop digging. Try to evaluate why your dog is digging and try some of the recommendations. Mose of all, give your dog all the love he deserves.

http://www.petsareagift.com
Joanne Curtis

http://www.petsareagift.com
Joanne Curtis/Author

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Joanne_Curtis

Randa

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Jul 27, 2011 | 0 | Tips, Training, Understanding Your Dog

Dogs With Arthritis May Need a Bed Step

By Steven Weber

As dogs age, many of them will develop the joint disease called osteoarthritis in canines. This arthritis disease is exactly the same as the disease that humans experience as they age. The problem caused by osteoarthritis is that it result in the degeneration of the tissue within the joints and thus causes pain and discomfort.

For house dogs which are used to jumping onto off of furniture and beds the joint arthritis disease becomes a significant problem as the dog ages. It becomes more more difficult for the dog to jump onto and off of the bed if there used sleeping there at night. Many pet owners simply have to lift the dog to and from the bed when needed. This is not an optimum solution since many times the dog needs to exit the bed in the night for drinks of water or simply to roam the house for a bit.

One solution is to search for commercially built bed steps which are readily available at numerous online locations. Although these steps are highly functional and will serve the purpose for allowing the dog to negotiate the bed easily, they can be quite expensive and sometimes require significant room within the bedroom. This can be an issue if budgets are tight or for people with small bedrooms.

Another solution for this is simply building the bed step yourself. This can be done quite easily with a few pieces of plywood, nails or screws, and an old throw rug. Begin by buying a piece of half-inch plywood at your local link store. You’ll need a soft cut the wood or perhaps in some stores they provide this service for a small fee.

You need to cut a piece of plywood about 18 inches wide and 3 feet long. This peaceful slide under the mattress between the box springs about 18 inches. This allows for about 18 inches to stick out from the bed; this will be the dog step. Now you’ll need another piece of plywood exactly 18 inches wide and the distance from the step to the floor. This piece will then act as a support at the end of the step to the floor. You can use screws or nails to fasten these two pieces of plywood together.

Once fasten together this makes for a very sturdy step as 18 inches of the top piece of plywood is wedged between the mattress and box springs. Now then, if you have an old throw rug and a staple gun you can take the rug and staple it to the top of the step and give the dog better traction when jumping onto and off of the step.

Most dogs with arthritis can easily be taught to use the step by offering some treats for them to jump onto and off of the bed when using the step. It won’t be long before the dog becomes quite used to using the step at all times when going off of or onto the bed.

Cactus Canyon has been selling health related solutions and products on the internet since 2004. Among their most widely used items is Synflex for dog Arthritis.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Steven_Weber

Randa

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Jul 26, 2011 | 2 | Dog health, Tips

Bouncy Jacks

By Nick Carreno

I have to admit, I had no idea what this article was going to be about. I was at the beach, totally relaxed, with not a care in the world. I sat down to write this article several times and I was drawing a complete blank. I sat and looked at the empty screen and try as I might there was nothing. I put this down to being at the beach house with all of the beach visits and relaxing why should I think of anything. That is when it happened. I was outside charging the AC for my truck when out of nowhere this little Jack Russell dashed over to me, tail wagging, happily bouncing in place. Those that own a Jack Russell can attest to the bouncing in place. My dogs were in the back yard at the time and as soon as they saw this little guy they went nuts. Jasmine (my black lab), to my amazement, forced her large frame under the fence and came running over to meet my new found friend. The Jack Russell didn’t run, or even flinch at the sight of this big dog bounding his way. He just turned toward her and continued to bounce in place. Jasmine and the Jack Russell took turns sniffing and they hit it off, it looked like Jasmine made a new friend. Frankie (our husky) remained in the back yard with little interest in anything happening on the other side of the fence.

The little Jack Russell was friendly, obviously well fed, yet he had no collar. I stooped down to pet him and he began to bounce higher, I didn’t think it possible, in place eating up all the attention. I picked him up and was greeted with a barrage of licks. At this point my wife, Nicole, came out to see what all the fuss was about. She saw me holding my new friend who was now going out of his mind to meet the new human on the scene. Nicole looked at me and said, what do we do now? She gathered up a very happy and excited Jasmine and put her in the back yard. I took our new friend to meet Frankie in the back yard. Frankie sniffed the much smaller dog looked at me and wandered to another part of the yard with a very happy Jack Russell in tow. Frankie was being her usual aloof self. I swear Frankie is more cat than dog sometimes. With all three of the dogs out of harm’s way in the back yard, I began to formulate a plan of action.

For those of you who are regular readers of my blog you will know that I wrote an article on what to do if you find a stray dog. I thought this the perfect opportunity to put that article to the test. The fact that the little guy didn’t have a collar was going to make things difficult. I knew he must have been recently lost because he was well fed and groomed, he was obviously not a vicious dog, he was however very bouncy, but that was kind of endearing. I figured his owners were frantically searching for their lost bundle of bounce. I got in my truck and slowly went up and down the streets expanding my search outward from where I first encountered the Jack Russell. I asked everyone I saw. I asked the man up the street who was watering his garden, he said the dog wasn’t his but he would ask around. I pointed him in the direction of my house. I asked a couple out for a stroll and they gave me a similar response. I saw an old man in a truck, and he seemed to be looking for something. I pulled alongside and asked him if he lost his dog. He said no, he was just out for a drive. He had a poodle mix in the front seat with him yipping away. He said he would keep his eyes out. I continued my search for another 10 minutes, I doubled back to retrace my route thinking I may have missed the searching owners. I again passed the man who was watering his garden when my phone rang. I answered it and it was my wife. She was frantic and dogs were barking. She said come home ASAP. I sped off before I noticed that the man watering his garden was trying to get my attention. I felt bad just leaving but my wife sounded like she was in some kind of trouble. That’s when I passed the old man in the red truck. He beeped at me and I slowed. He said those people lost a dog and I sent them to your house. I couldn’t believe it. My wife was frantically trying to control our two dogs while greeting the couple at our back gate. As it turns out, they were neighbors from up the street. I have known them for a very long time. I did not know they had recently gotten a Jack Russell named Mickey. I thanked the man in the red truck for his help then it dawned on me, the more people I told about a lost dog, the more people were out there looking. It gave me such a sense of community to know that neighbors still help each other in this day and age. I am sure the man that had been watering his garden was trying to get my attention because he knew the owners had been found.

I pulled up and greeted our neighbors and helped my wife settle our two dogs who were obviously very upset that Mickey was leaving. I chatted with the neighbors and they thanked me for keeping Mickey safe. Later that evening our neighbors showed up with a thank you treat for our dogs. All was right with the world and I had my article. Thanks for reading and remember to keep your furry family members healthy and happy, and on occasion help your neighbor to keep their dog healthy and happy if they need a hand.

If you love dogs, or you are thinking of getting a dog, even if you have dog related questions, check out my blog http://doggiediaries4u.blogspot.com/ you just may find the answers you are looking for.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Nick_Carreno

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6444690 

I have to admit, I had no idea what this article was going to be about. I was at the beach, totally relaxed, with not a care in the world. I sat down to write this article several times and I was drawing a complete blank. I sat and looked at the empty screen and try as I might there was nothing. I put this down to being at the beach house with all of the beach visits and relaxing why should I think of anything. That is when it happened. I was outside charging the AC for my truck when out of nowhere this little Jack Russell dashed over to me, tail wagging, happily bouncing in place. Those that own a Jack Russell can attest to the bouncing in place. My dogs were in the back yard at the time and as soon as they saw this little guy they went nuts. Jasmine (my black lab), to my amazement, forced her large frame under the fence and came running over to meet my new found friend. The Jack Russell didn’t run, or even flinch at the sight of this big dog bounding his way. He just turned toward her and continued to bounce in place. Jasmine and the Jack Russell took turns sniffing and they hit it off, it looked like Jasmine made a new friend. Frankie (our husky) remained in the back yard with little interest in anything happening on the other side of the fence.

The little Jack Russell was friendly, obviously well fed, yet he had no collar. I stooped down to pet him and he began to bounce higher, I didn’t think it possible, in place eating up all the attention. I picked him up and was greeted with a barrage of licks. At this point my wife, Nicole, came out to see what all the fuss was about. She saw me holding my new friend who was now going out of his mind to meet the new human on the scene. Nicole looked at me and said, what do we do now? She gathered up a very happy and excited Jasmine and put her in the back yard. I took our new friend to meet Frankie in the back yard. Frankie sniffed the much smaller dog looked at me and wandered to another part of the yard with a very happy Jack Russell in tow. Frankie was being her usual aloof self. I swear Frankie is more cat than dog sometimes. With all three of the dogs out of harm’s way in the back yard, I began to formulate a plan of action.

For those of you who are regular readers of my blog you will know that I wrote an article on what to do if you find a stray dog. I thought this the perfect opportunity to put that article to the test. The fact that the little guy didn’t have a collar was going to make things difficult. I knew he must have been recently lost because he was well fed and groomed, he was obviously not a vicious dog, he was however very bouncy, but that was kind of endearing. I figured his owners were frantically searching for their lost bundle of bounce. I got in my truck and slowly went up and down the streets expanding my search outward from where I first encountered the Jack Russell. I asked everyone I saw. I asked the man up the street who was watering his garden, he said the dog wasn’t his but he would ask around. I pointed him in the direction of my house. I asked a couple out for a stroll and they gave me a similar response. I saw an old man in a truck, and he seemed to be looking for something. I pulled alongside and asked him if he lost his dog. He said no, he was just out for a drive. He had a poodle mix in the front seat with him yipping away. He said he would keep his eyes out. I continued my search for another 10 minutes, I doubled back to retrace my route thinking I may have missed the searching owners. I again passed the man who was watering his garden when my phone rang. I answered it and it was my wife. She was frantic and dogs were barking. She said come home ASAP. I sped off before I noticed that the man watering his garden was trying to get my attention. I felt bad just leaving but my wife sounded like she was in some kind of trouble. That’s when I passed the old man in the red truck. He beeped at me and I slowed. He said those people lost a dog and I sent them to your house. I couldn’t believe it. My wife was frantically trying to control our two dogs while greeting the couple at our back gate. As it turns out, they were neighbors from up the street. I have known them for a very long time. I did not know they had recently gotten a Jack Russell named Mickey. I thanked the man in the red truck for his help then it dawned on me, the more people I told about a lost dog, the more people were out there looking. It gave me such a sense of community to know that neighbors still help each other in this day and age. I am sure the man that had been watering his garden was trying to get my attention because he knew the owners had been found.

I pulled up and greeted our neighbors and helped my wife settle our two dogs who were obviously very upset that Mickey was leaving. I chatted with the neighbors and they thanked me for keeping Mickey safe. Later that evening our neighbors showed up with a thank you treat for our dogs. All was right with the world and I had my article. Thanks for reading and remember to keep your furry family members healthy and happy, and on occasion help your neighbor to keep their dog healthy and happy if they need a hand.

If you love dogs, or you are thinking of getting a dog, even if you have dog related questions, check out my blog http://doggiediaries4u.blogspot.com/ you just may find the answers you are looking for.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Nick_Carreno

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 25, 2011 | 0 | Dog breed information

Dogs Have a Hard Life in Bali – Do You Care Too?

By Randa Magdi

Our attention has recently been focussed on Indonesia with the issue of the live export of cattle and I have found this incredibly heart-breaking. But it seems Indonesia is not a great place for most animals. Take the dog for instance..

Late last year my partner and I went to Bali for the first time and while we enjoyed the holiday we felt disturbed to see so many stray dogs wandering the streets and beaches. It gave us comfort to see the dogs with a collar on because this was an indication that the dog was claimed by someone who at least fed it and hopefully took care of it. It was on this  holiday that we took a half day trip to Ubud to visit the dog sanctuary, BARC. This stands for the Bali Adoption and Rehabilitation Centre.. and I vowed to help these dogs in whatever small way I could.

United, we can truly make a difference to the lives of many of these beautiful dogs. While people can voice the opposition to the live cattle trade – you can feel helpless given that we must wait for politicians to make the final decisions to stop this vile trade even though we are stomping up and down for this evil trade to stop. But with the dogs, regular people like you and I can make a difference and our Australian dollar goes a long way in Bali .

It took an artist trying to begin life in a new country to start the Bali Adoption and Rehabilitation Centre (BARC).

Linda Buller is an expatriate Australian artist living in Ubud, Bali . For five years Linda was witnessing the awful situation dogs endure in Bali . During this time she was taking pups back to her humble abode to offer some food and love. Like so many others, Linda wished she could just shut her eyes and blank it all out. “As a painter, how does one paint in peace with so much pain and suffering around them?”, Linda said. “I am rebellious, rude, angry and stubborn, but my heart is full of love for humanity and our animal friends”, said Linda.

“Tiny pups in Bali , and other abused homeless dogs there have no resources and no hope – their tails and heads hang down. They drag their sad bodies from rubbish bin to the gutters scavenging and hiding, cowering at a human presence – living their entire lives in fear, hunger and suspicion. The average life span for a dog in Bali is one to two years” it says on the BARC website.

“Dogs on the street of Bali often suffer from broken legs. They are hit by cars in narrow streets and left to cope with the pain and the struggle to survive. Many dogs have manage – they have no fur and their skin becomes thick and scabby. The pain for them must seem unbearable. Female dogs are often dumped. They are not considered aggressive enough to become guard dogs. Most dogs die a slow and preventable death. Boiling water has been thrown at dogs to keep them away from kitchens“, the harsh truth continues.

Recently it appears  three puppies were thrown into the sea to drown and they all swam back to shore. Then they were thrown out again. A lady stopped after hearing the screaming and saved two of the pups – the third one did not make it back.

“Most dog cringe at the sight of a human. We are the enemy, the abuser… They hide from detection, they live in fear, they have never known love or affection or been given food freely. When BARC get them usually their spirits have been broken. They hope the warm love, medications, warm blankets and a pause from the rigours of a very hostile world will mend each one. Slowly they do trust and respond affectionately to humans, said this kind and caring BARC volunteer”.

Take this dog who was lying blissfully on the beach just the other day keeping away from tourists and minding his own business. A volunteer at BARC just happened to be close by when staff members from the Itan Sari Cafe in Jimbaran threw a large coconut at the dog who started to cry in pain . Please do NOT eat there if you visit Bali and- spread the word? (he had a collar and was vaccinated ). Even the manager, Nyoman Budiartha, and the staff thought if was funny and said they would continue to do this and threatened the people trying to help this poor dog. I tried to email these people but it bounced so I called them from Sydney! It was hard to communicate. I then sent a message care of this booking site.

 

As a member of the BARC Facebook group I saw a post by founder Linda Buller a day or so after hearing about the dog on the beach. Linda spoke of the way many people all through Indonesia keep Western dog breeds in small wire cages – all day and all night with as many as four dogs in one cage unable to even turn around.  In the burning heat these dog’s feet only touch the wire cage floor and they are left with no water. They have never tasted meat nor have they walked on grass! See Linda yourself here and learn more about BARC:

YouTube Preview Image

They need your help. Please follow balidogrefuge on Twitter and visit the the BARC website - together we can really help these poor darling dogs.. Incidentally while BARC was set up dogs they in fact help all animals in need – cats, monkeys .. you name it! Love your work BARC!



Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 22, 2011 | 0 | Stray dogs

Dog Food Recipes for Dogs With Allergies

By Steven A Wright

Dogs with allergies need special consideration and part of that is a change in diet. This can be easily accomplished by a simple search for dog food recipes for dogs with allergies. Dogs that have allergies in the large part have a serious sensitivity to commercially prepared food, which is the food that is generally available for a fairly low cost in your local supermarket.

Although commercially prepared dog food may be convenient, there is actually very little that the manufacturers take into consideration when it comes to your dog’s health and need for a nutritious food. Dog food recipes for dogs with allergies tend to be a more healthy choice for several reasons.

  • The ingredients that are used in these recipes are usually whole or fresh foods, or foods, lean meats and broths for flavoring. There are no added preservatives or fillers. Fillers are added to commercially prepared dog food to increase their bulk and weight, but provide absolutely no nutritional value whatsoever.
  • You can control exactly what goes into dog food recipes for dogs with allergies by choosing the recipes that you deem appropriate.
  • Large batches of these recipes can be prepared and then divided into individual serving sizes which can be frozen for future use.

Many dog owners find that dog food recipes for dogs with allergies are readily available in many popular sources.

You may go to your local bookstore and purchase a book, download one online or even find recipes for free. The recipes in themselves are great; however, you will need to supplement the food by adding minerals and vitamins to ensure that your dog is getting all of the nutritional value that he requires daily.

There are many ways to prepare dog food recipes for dogs with allergies.

The best thing to keep in mind is that you want to prepare large quantities of the recipe as mentioned earlier, so that you do not have to prepare it repeatedly throughout the week. You may wish to prepare enough for several weeks, and you also may wish to prepare more than one recipe to give your dog some variety.

Eating the same thing day in and day out can become very mundane, as you are probably quite aware. In addition, if you are supplementing, be sure to keep the vitamins and minerals separate from the recipe, adding it in only at the last moment in order to ensure optimum benefit from a fresh supplement.

Once you stop feeding your dog a commercially available food and begin feeding him a restaurant quality home recipe dog food (restaurant quality when compared to the garbage available for purchase in a bag). You will begin to notice many changes for the better. Your dog will probably stop scratching, hot spots will disappear, there will be no more paw licking and his skin will begin to become less dry. Your dog deserves to be healthy and happy and you have a responsibility to feed him as best as you can, while also ensuring he is receiving the proper nutrition.

Following dog food recipes for dogs with allergies is a simple and cost effective method of enhancing your pet’s general wellbeing.

If you own Dogs With Allergies then dietry Dog Food Recipes will help provide better health and increase your dogs quality of life.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Steven_A_Wright

Randa

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Jul 21, 2011 | 0 | Dog nutrition

How to Protect Your Dog From Fleas In The Yard

By Kate Rieger

If you’ve been fighting fleas in the yard, aggressive treatments are an essential part of gaining a foot hold over the infestation. Treating just your dog or cat will mean that fleas and their eggs will be left in the yard to continue the cycle.

The flea life cycle consists of four stages. They are the egg, larvae, pupae and adult biting fleas in your yard. Treatments should target each of these stages to break the life cycle. Adult fleas lay their eggs on the host and then the egg drops out wherever the host rests, lies, or plays. These eggs then hatch and go into the larvae stage. From there, they then move to the pupae stage waiting to emerge as an adult flea. The entire cycle takes approximately two weeks.

Many pesticides and other treatments target the adult fleas. In yard treatments often only address the adult stage while leaving the eggs or pupae to continue to hatch and grow. This is counter productive, leaving many continuing to buy pesticides that are only targeting a small part of the problem.

Killing fleas in the pupae stage is almost impossible. The key to keeping the infestation under control is to use a product on the egg and larvae stages to prevent them from getting to the pupae stage. There are natural products available that are designed for this purpose that will not only keep your pet free of fleas, but will not expose him or her to harmful chemicals.

It’s nearly impossible to prevent fleas in the yard. Some improvements can lower the risk of fleas making it on to your property to begin with. Fleas move from one host to another and a stray dog or cat can wander through your yard leaving little presents as they go. Having solid fencing around your yard can prevent these visitors and their unwanted friends from coming over uninvited. In addition, keeping your pets on your own property gives you more control. If your pets are spending time on property other than your own, you don’t know what if any flea control that property owner has.

A good approach to flea control is multi-pronged. You can stop this from ever happening by making some simple changes to ward off an infestation of fleas. You can actually kill adult fleas in with a simple, all natural solution. Sprinkle food grade diatomaceous soil lightly in your dog’s bedding and in areas he likes to sleep. You can use the food grade DE in your home and garden to deal with fleas or bed bug infestations. In yard improvements and treatments will finish the life cycle of the flea leaving you and your pets happy and pest free.

Find this all natural flea killer here. More ideas for using food grade diatomaceous earth.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kate_Rieger

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 20, 2011 | 0 | Dog health, Tips