Archives for June, 2011

Children and the New Puppy

by Wendon Lee

You’ve chosen a puppy breed, named it properly, introduced it to its new home and bought all the supplies it will ever need – now what? For homes with children, now comes the beginning of a rough period between excitement for a new puppy and working hard to keep both puppy and kids happy until the pup gets a little older. Dealing with puppies and children together is sometimes a challenge in several ways. Knowing to watch for roughness, avoid shouting and squeezing, and limiting play time are some great tidbits to keep your home running smoothly, puppy, children and all.

Watch for Roughness

When a puppy owner thinks of roughness, the first thing that comes to mind is usually a child being rough with the pup. However, watching for roughness by the puppy toward the children is also a key factor in creating a harmonious family situation. Puppies of both very large and very small breeds pose specific dangers for children who do not know better than to “play” and rile their new puppy up. Very small breeds tend to be very excitable and can cause scratching from jumping and pouncing on kids, while larger breeds, without knowing it, can grab onto a child’s arm with its mouth and unintentionally cause harm, playing as if it would with its canine peers.

Shouting and Squeezing

Training and housebreaking a puppy can be stressful and complicated, but even more so with children involved. Though including them in training the pup is a good idea, children tend to think shouting or being rough with a puppy when it misbehaves is acceptable, when it can unintentionally throw training back a few steps. Discourage shouting at the puppy at all costs, as well as squeezing or being rough with it. This can cause stress on an impressionable puppy and sometimes provoke repercussions in the form of a physical response – biting, scratching or frantically trying to escape, leading to more squeezing and possibly an injury to the puppy, child or both.

Limit Play Time

Though encouraging bonding time between children and a family pet (especially puppies) is very important, it is also important to keep in mind how stressed and afraid a new puppy can sometimes be in a strange home with strange companions. Encourage safe and playful bonding time between children and the new puppy, but limit this playtime to 30-45 minutes at a time. This is to give puppy time to get used to the children between play sessions as well as giving it time to sleep and rest in general. Puppies, like very small children, require many hours of sleep to grow and recuperate from heavy play.

Pet Place provides resources on how you can learn more about crate training puppies and puppy vaccinations.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Wendon_Lee

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6384202

 

Randa

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And you can follow us on twitter too

Jun 29, 2011 | 0 | Choosing your dog

Five Types of Dog Skin Diseases

By Karen Soukiasian

As many dog owners will attest, canine skin diseases can drive both a dog and their person, right up a wall. The dog’s incessant licking, whining, and scratching is not only heart breaking to watch, it’s maddening to listen to hour after hour, day after day.

There are five types of canine skin diseases. They include allergies, auto-immune/immune mediated, infectious skin diseases, developmental/hereditary circumstances, and internal diseases. On top of that, secondary infections, such as yeast infections, can occur if the problem is not address at once.

Types of Skin Diseases of Dogs

Allergies

Dogs can be allergic to a load of things, such as: food, insect bites (flea/ticks), environmental irritants (lawn service chemicals, pollen, household cleaning chemicals, chemicals used to process rawhide chews, hoofs, bones and horns), medications, and even products, like plastic feeding bowls!

Auto-immune/Immune Disorders

Skin diseases such as Atopic Dermatitis, Canine Lupus, Canine Diabetes, kidney problems, hot spots and Acral Lick Dermatitis can be caused by auto-immune or immune syndromes. These types of skin diseases occur when the dog’s immune system is either not working enough, or is working overtime, and thereby attacking itself. These skin diseases are usually the most serious, and could be fatal.

Infectious Skin Disease

Infectious skin disease can be parasitic, bacterial, viral, or fungal. Many are contagious. A few infectious skin diseases are even zoonotic. That means the disease can be passed from the pet to the owner. Sarcoptic Mange, caused by mites, is contagious and can be passed between dog and owner. Demodectic Mange also caused by mites is not considered contagious. Ringworm, which is a fungus, not a worm, is a zoonotic disease. Lyme Disease, from tick bites and Dipylidium, (tapeworm) from fleas, can be passed from dog to owner. Lice and mites are additional parasites that transmit contagious infectious skin diseases.

Hereditary/Developmental Skin Disease

Puppy Strangles, Seborretic Dermatitis, Ehlers-Danos, Canine Follical Dysplasia, Cushing’s Disease and Hypotricosis are skin diseases that dogs either inherit, or get, either while a puppy, or later in life. Hypothyrodism is an example.

Internal Diseases Cutaneous Manifestations

Endocrine (hormone) abnormalities can be the origin of hypothyroidism, Cushing’s Disease and tumors. Impacted anal sacs can also cause irritation to the surrounding area. In mild to moderate cases the sac can be expressed. In severe cases, they may have to be surgically removed.

Symptoms To Watch For

It’s easy to pick the dog with skin problems from the rest of the pack. Typically, there is a foul odor from their hair or skin. Hair and skin could appear greasy and matted., or brittle, dull and dry. Skin may be dry, thick, discolored. They could have open sores, ring-shaped sores, redness or weepy sores, bald spots, fever, scooting, hair loss, anemia, obsessive licking or chewing, scabs, head tilting or shaking, lopsided ears, black debris in ears, excessive wax in ears, ear infections, rubbing against objects, rolling, cysts, abscesses, tumors, skin has white scales or flakes, patchy sores or hairless areas, excessive shedding, and/or area feels warm to the touch. The most common areas for skin disease problems are the dog’s face, head, ears, paws, between digits of the paws, forelegs, armpits, belly, tail and anal area.

If your dog exhibits any of the above, take them to your veterinarian for testing, diagnosis and treatment.

Tests and Diagnosis

To diagnose which type of skin disease your dog may have, your veterinarian has several testing options. They include, blood tests, skin biopsy, cytology (examine cells under microscope), intradermal allergy tests, cultures (bacterial and viral) and video oloscopy.

Treatment

Depending on the severity of the problem, treatments options include: daily brushing, medicated shampoo, change of diet, oral and topical antibiotics, anti-fungal ointments, and/or e-collar. Your veterinarian may recommend oil massages. Skin conditions are commonly treated with corticosteroids. Anal sacs can be expressed or surgically removed. Tumors may be surgically removed.

Breeds Prone To Skin Problems

The following are a few popular breeds that are prone to skin problems and disease: Akita, Alaskan Malamute, American Cocker Spaniel, American Water Spaniel, Australian Terrier, Beagle, Bichon Frise, Boxers, Bull Terrier, Chow-Chow, Collies, Dachshund, Dalmatian German Shepherd Dog, Lhasa Apso, Miniature Pinscher, Miniature Schnauzer, Old English Sheepdog, Poodle (Toy, Miniature and Standard), Samoyed, Scottish Terrier, Shar-Pei, Siberian Husky, Toy Fox Terrier, and Wire Fox Terrier.

Bottom line: Don’t waste time. Your pet is in extreme discomfort. Don’t let them suffer unnecessarily. Seek veterinary help. It may be nothing; it could be serious, and possibly fatal.

Karen A. Soukiasian, GOOD DOG! – DOG TRAINING and BED-n-BISCUITS dog boarding and training – Owner/Trainer, St. Augustine, Florida – AKC CANINE GOOD CITIZEN and S.T.A.R. PUPPY Evaluator http://www.freewebs.com/gooddogsite
http://www.facebook.com/pages/GOOD-DOG-DOG-TRAINING/95917282486

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Karen_Soukiasian

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6381398

As many dog owners will attest, canine skin diseases can drive both a dog and their person, right up a wall. The dog’s incessant licking, whining, and scratching is not only heart breaking to watch, it’s maddening to listen to hour after hour, day after day.

There are five types of canine skin diseases. They include allergies, auto-immune/immune mediated, infectious skin diseases, developmental/hereditary circumstances, and internal diseases. On top of that, secondary infections, such as yeast infections, can occur if the problem is not address at once.

Types of Skin Diseases of Dogs

Allergies

Dogs can be allergic to a load of things, such as: food, insect bites (flea/ticks), environmental irritants (lawn service chemicals, pollen, household cleaning chemicals, chemicals used to process rawhide chews, hoofs, bones and horns), medications, and even products, like plastic feeding bowls!

Auto-immune/Immune Disorders

Skin diseases such as Atopic Dermatitis, Canine Lupus, Canine Diabetes, kidney problems, hot spots and Acral Lick Dermatitis can be caused by auto-immune or immune syndromes. These types of skin diseases occur when the dog’s immune system is either not working enough, or is working overtime, and thereby attacking itself. These skin diseases are usually the most serious, and could be fatal.

Infectious Skin Disease

Infectious skin disease can be parasitic, bacterial, viral, or fungal. Many are contagious. A few infectious skin diseases are even zoonotic. That means the disease can be passed from the pet to the owner. Sarcoptic Mange, caused by mites, is contagious and can be passed between dog and owner. Demodectic Mange also caused by mites is not considered contagious. Ringworm, which is a fungus, not a worm, is a zoonotic disease. Lyme Disease, from tick bites and Dipylidium, (tapeworm) from fleas, can be passed from dog to owner. Lice and mites are additional parasites that transmit contagious infectious skin diseases.

Hereditary/Developmental Skin Disease

Puppy Strangles, Seborretic Dermatitis, Ehlers-Danos, Canine Follical Dysplasia, Cushing’s Disease and Hypotricosis are skin diseases that dogs either inherit, or get, either while a puppy, or later in life. Hypothyrodism is an example.

Internal Diseases Cutaneous Manifestations

Endocrine (hormone) abnormalities can be the origin of hypothyroidism, Cushing’s Disease and tumors. Impacted anal sacs can also cause irritation to the surrounding area. In mild to moderate cases the sac can be expressed. In severe cases, they may have to be surgically removed.

Symptoms To Watch For

It’s easy to pick the dog with skin problems from the rest of the pack. Typically, there is a foul odor from their hair or skin. Hair and skin could appear greasy and matted., or brittle, dull and dry. Skin may be dry, thick, discolored. They could have open sores, ring-shaped sores, redness or weepy sores, bald spots, fever, scooting, hair loss, anemia, obsessive licking or chewing, scabs, head tilting or shaking, lopsided ears, black debris in ears, excessive wax in ears, ear infections, rubbing against objects, rolling, cysts, abscesses, tumors, skin has white scales or flakes, patchy sores or hairless areas, excessive shedding, and/or area feels warm to the touch. The most common areas for skin disease problems are the dog’s face, head, ears, paws, between digits of the paws, forelegs, armpits, belly, tail and anal area.

If your dog exhibits any of the above, take them to your veterinarian for testing, diagnosis and treatment.

Tests and Diagnosis

To diagnose which type of skin disease your dog may have, your veterinarian has several testing options. They include, blood tests, skin biopsy, cytology (examine cells under microscope), intradermal allergy tests, cultures (bacterial and viral) and video oloscopy.

Treatment

Depending on the severity of the problem, treatments options include: daily brushing, medicated shampoo, change of diet, oral and topical antibiotics, anti-fungal ointments, and/or e-collar. Your veterinarian may recommend oil massages. Skin conditions are commonly treated with corticosteroids. Anal sacs can be expressed or surgically removed. Tumors may be surgically removed.

Breeds Prone To Skin Problems

The following are a few popular breeds that are prone to skin problems and disease: Akita, Alaskan Malamute, American Cocker Spaniel, American Water Spaniel, Australian Terrier, Beagle, Bichon Frise, Boxers, Bull Terrier, Chow-Chow, Collies, Dachshund, Dalmatian German Shepherd Dog, Lhasa Apso, Miniature Pinscher, Miniature Schnauzer, Old English Sheepdog, Poodle (Toy, Miniature and Standard), Samoyed, Scottish Terrier, Shar-Pei, Siberian Husky, Toy Fox Terrier, and Wire Fox Terrier.

Bottom line: Don’t waste time. Your pet is in extreme discomfort. Don’t let them suffer unnecessarily. Seek veterinary help. It may be nothing; it could be serious, and possibly fatal.

Karen A. Soukiasian, GOOD DOG! – DOG TRAINING and BED-n-BISCUITS dog boarding and training – Owner/Trainer, St. Augustine, Florida – AKC CANINE GOOD CITIZEN and S.T.A.R. PUPPY Evaluator http://www.freewebs.com/gooddogsite
http://www.facebook.com/pages/GOOD-DOG-DOG-TRAINING/95917282486

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Karen_Soukiasian

Randa

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And you can follow us on twitter too

Jun 28, 2011 | 0 | Dog health

Multiple Dogs: Four Things to Consider Before Adding a Second Dog to Your Family

By Kathy H Porter

It wasn’t until I volunteered with a dog rescue organization that I began to understand the dynamics that affect families who live with two or more dogs. After 7 years of placing ex-racing greyhounds into pet homes, I’d learned quite a lot about mult-dog households. I’d like to shorten your learning curve about this topic by giving you four tips to consider before you decide to bring a second or third dog into your home.

Know your pack. If you are a one dog family, consider bringing in a dog of the opposite sex and one that is less dominate than the dog you now have. As an example, when my family decided to add a third dog to our household, we decided that dog number three would have to be female because our male Great Dane was the more dominate of the two dogs we had. He would tolerate another female dog but would have no patience for a male.

That said, one of my good friends lives quite happily with three female whippets. Does this mean that my initial advice isn’t sound? Not at all. The key component is knowing your pack. My whippet friend knows her dogs. Each time she added a whippet, she carefully considered the temperaments of her dogs. Having three female dogs works for her. Make sure that you are discerning enough to know what will work for you.

Be financially responsible. Make a list of all of the expenses you had for dog number one over the past 12 months. Food, vet bills, obedience class, boarding costs, unexpected vet bills, collars, leashes, bedding, toys and anything else that you spent money on. Now multiply all of those expenses by two. Can you afford this? And, be sure you’re in compliance with the number of dogs your city/town legally allows you to own.

Fence Your Yard. Although I have known families who were able to have one dog without any kind of fencing, not having a fenced yard with two or more dogs just isn’t practical. Nor is it safe. Hands down, this will be your best purchase.

Timing. Take the time to evaluate what’s going on in your family and ask yourself if now is a good time to add another dog. If you’re getting ready to move, or have just changed jobs, perhaps it’s best to wait until things settle down.

And now I’d like to invite you to claim your free report about the how understanding dog behavior can affect your success. Visit: http://www.healingrescuedogs.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kathy_H_Porter

 

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jun 25, 2011 | 0 | Choosing your dog, dog behavior, Understanding Your Dog

Dog Food Recipes Information – Home-Made Is Best

By Marie Sutton

All dog owners are concerned with providing their pets with optimal nutrition and of course that comes from good quality brands. It is no surprise that many people look for information about dog food recipes online. With most dogs now living in urban areas they are largely fed prepackaged and processed dog food.

It’s no secret that modern processed dog foods sometimes contain less goodness and nutrition than many believe. In fact, there are several health problems associated with some ingredients included in commercial preparations.

That’s not to say that all the processed pet foods will harm your dog.

However, if you want your dog to live an active long and happy life you can be assured that by feeding them homemade meals you will have a healthy pet.

In the same way as humans need a balanced diet and a diet which includes all the essential nutrients for good development of bones and tissues, so do dogs. Poor nutrition and a lack of the necessary nutrients can reduce the life expectancy of your dog and can contribute to slow or stunted growth and slow recovery after injury.

Proteins in Dog Nutrition

Proteins are a very important part of the nutrients in a dog’s diet. Not only are they critical for almost all aspects of growth and development, they contribute to the efficiency of your dogs immune system. It is important to recognize that excess proteins convert to, and can be stored as fat.

Good dog food recipes will include the correct balance of proteins to other nutrients, so if fed at the right amount, your dog will be fit, healthy and not overweight.

There is ample information about dog food recipes available from reputable sites across the net.

Dog owners should understand some of the labeling which pets food companies use on their products concerning the ingredients in their food.

Usually, the level of protein on pet food labels is the total protein content of the food and not the amount of digestible protein. In better quality foods, the level of digestible protein can be above 70%. Some lower quality foods have a digestible protein level of less than 60%.

Meat and chicken byproducts, which most commercial dog foods contain, provide adequate levels of digestible protein. Sometimes, the quality of these foods is not high, but the protein is provided in an acceptable form. Grains can be used in dog food recipes to provide protein, but they are really not providing a high percentage of digestible protein.

In lots of ways, grains simply add to the carbohydrate load of the food. Meat and bone meal, which are commonly used in commercial recipes are lower quality forms of protein and hence contain less digestible protein.

Fats

In the human world, fat intake is seen as a negative, it is a critical part of your dog’s diet. Actually, fats contain quite a lot of energy, and since dogs are very active, the correct amount of fat in dog food recipes is important. Fats also contribute to kidney function and the maintenance of healthy skin and a nice shiny coat.

Carbohydrates

Another critical part of a dog’s diet which provides them with energy, is carbohydrates. Dogs require a clean source of carbohydrate that they can use for energy.

Summary

By discovering good information about dog food recipes, and preparing your dog a well-balanced and nutritional home-made meal, it is possible to closely regulate the nutrients and nutrition you are feeding them. Once you know the correct proportions and correct levels of each food, element, you can give them the correct portion size for their breed and body weight.

You will also know that your recipes contain no artificial flavorings, preservatives or additives. Lots of home-made dog food recipes include ingredients like vegetables, pumpkins, honey, bananas, peanut butter and apples.

Of course they also contain hardly nutritious meats, fish, turkey and chicken. Some people start feeding homemade foods because their dogs might have been diagnosed with some kind of food allergy brought on by the ingredients in commercial foods. Others, because their dog may have a health condition or requires a special diet.

They do all understand that if they find dog food recipe information, they can get away from the low-quality, processed commercial pet food.

Marie Sutton is a dog food recipes expert. Find more great information on dog food recipes. Dog food recipes information Free Mini Course.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Marie_Sutton

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6362549

All dog owners are concerned with providing their pets with optimal nutrition and of course that comes from good quality brands. It is no surprise that many people look for information about dog food recipes online. With most dogs now living in urban areas they are largely fed prepackaged and processed dog food.

It’s no secret that modern processed dog foods sometimes contain less goodness and nutrition than many believe. In fact, there are several health problems associated with some ingredients included in commercial preparations.

That’s not to say that all the processed pet foods will harm your dog.

However, if you want your dog to live an active long and happy life you can be assured that by feeding them homemade meals you will have a healthy pet.

In the same way as humans need a balanced diet and a diet which includes all the essential nutrients for good development of bones and tissues, so do dogs. Poor nutrition and a lack of the necessary nutrients can reduce the life expectancy of your dog and can contribute to slow or stunted growth and slow recovery after injury.

Proteins in Dog Nutrition

Proteins are a very important part of the nutrients in a dog’s diet. Not only are they critical for almost all aspects of growth and development, they contribute to the efficiency of your dogs immune system. It is important to recognize that excess proteins convert to, and can be stored as fat.

Good dog food recipes will include the correct balance of proteins to other nutrients, so if fed at the right amount, your dog will be fit, healthy and not overweight.

There is ample information about dog food recipes available from reputable sites across the net.

Dog owners should understand some of the labeling which pets food companies use on their products concerning the ingredients in their food.

Usually, the level of protein on pet food labels is the total protein content of the food and not the amount of digestible protein. In better quality foods, the level of digestible protein can be above 70%. Some lower quality foods have a digestible protein level of less than 60%.

Meat and chicken byproducts, which most commercial dog foods contain, provide adequate levels of digestible protein. Sometimes, the quality of these foods is not high, but the protein is provided in an acceptable form. Grains can be used in dog food recipes to provide protein, but they are really not providing a high percentage of digestible protein.

In lots of ways, grains simply add to the carbohydrate load of the food. Meat and bone meal, which are commonly used in commercial recipes are lower quality forms of protein and hence contain less digestible protein.

Fats

In the human world, fat intake is seen as a negative, it is a critical part of your dog’s diet. Actually, fats contain quite a lot of energy, and since dogs are very active, the correct amount of fat in dog food recipes is important. Fats also contribute to kidney function and the maintenance of healthy skin and a nice shiny coat.

Carbohydrates

Another critical part of a dog’s diet which provides them with energy, is carbohydrates. Dogs require a clean source of carbohydrate that they can use for energy.

Summary

By discovering good information about dog food recipes, and preparing your dog a well-balanced and nutritional home-made meal, it is possible to closely regulate the nutrients and nutrition you are feeding them. Once you know the correct proportions and correct levels of each food, element, you can give them the correct portion size for their breed and body weight.

You will also know that your recipes contain no artificial flavorings, preservatives or additives. Lots of home-made dog food recipes include ingredients like vegetables, pumpkins, honey, bananas, peanut butter and apples.

Of course they also contain hardly nutritious meats, fish, turkey and chicken. Some people start feeding homemade foods because their dogs might have been diagnosed with some kind of food allergy brought on by the ingredients in commercial foods. Others, because their dog may have a health condition or requires a special diet.

They do all understand that if they find dog food recipe information, they can get away from the low-quality, processed commercial pet food.

Marie Sutton is a dog food recipes expert. Find more great information on dog food recipes. Dog food recipes information Free Mini Course.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Marie_Sutton

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jun 24, 2011 | 1 | Dog nutrition

Homemade Versus Commercial Dog Food

By Jerri Torres

It has long been debated whether homemade or commercial food is better for your dog. To allow pet owners to decide for yourselves, you are provided with a list of what you should be looking for in a good quality dog food. These qualities can apply to either homemade or commercial items.

Good quality of the meat. Homemade dog food can easily have this quality. What you need to do is to shop for good quality meat and use that to feed your dog.

When it comes to commercial food products, making sure this criterion is met can be a little tricky. Owners cannot readily check the quality of the meat that was used. You can just stick to what you have used in the past. The brand name of the product and its past records will also be an important determinant.

Meat by-products such as organs are usually not advisable to be included in the dog food. So, when you are personally preparing the food, make sure that you do not include these. And when you are buying food, you can simply avoid these by looking at the label and making sure that you do not see terms such as ‘by-products’, ‘grains’, ‘organs’ or etc.

High amounts of animal proteins. Your pets need adequate intake of animal proteins. This provides for better growth and development. Also, muscle repair in cases of injury can be well facilitated by enough protein intake.

Avoid including or choosing products that have vegetable proteins in them. Although these would not produce any negative effects to your pets, these will not be as effective as animal proteins. It’s the same way as saying that you are feeding them non nutritious food.

You can include vegetables in your pet’s diet. But, you should know that they won’t need too much. You can include vegetables to meet the requirements for vitamins and some minerals. And in order to meet this, you only need minimal amounts of most veggies.

Avoid chemical additives. Chemical additives have varied purposes. Most commonly, it is to increase the shelf life of the food. Others use it to enhance flavor or color of the product. For homemade items, chemical additives can be almost completely avoided.

Buying commercial food products, though, would alert dog owners with regards these additives. Unfortunately, most of these additives are carcinogenic. Trusted food brands and those that have passed government standards may give you the guarantee that you are not buying a processed food product.

Choose which one costs less. Depending on what ingredients you buy or which brand you choose, you can see the significant difference on the price between a homemade dog food and a commercial dog food. So, if you still can’t decide which to give your pet based on the criteria above, you can take expenses into consideration.

So, you can feed your dog with homemade or commercial dog food. But, the most important things to consider are listed above and you should feed your dog based on these characteristics.

Jerri Torres enjoys writing for Petflow which sells Royal Canin and solid gold brand dog food as well as a host of additional products.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerri_Torres

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jun 23, 2011 | 1 | Dog nutrition

Is Hiring a Dog Listener the Best Dog Training Advice?

By Cassie Hicks Dullea

You may feel the need for training advice when getting a new dog, whether a puppy or a dog from the rescue shelter. There are many schools of thought about the best methods for training dogs, and some would advocate hiring a dog listener.

My rescue dog has some behavioural issues towards other dogs (either due to a bad experience as a puppy or perhaps lack of socialisation) and I feel it’s important to get help for her and for myself. At the end of the day, pets want to please us and we want to enjoy their company without having to worry about their behaviour or the fear they may harm someone.

Having come across a local dog listener through a local networking group I decided to do some research and find out whether this would be the best option for myself and my dog. The first point of call was the search engines and the pet forums.

When asking for advice on the forums the response was rapid and strong, and not positive. First-hand experience was what I was seeking but the feedback was certainly food for thought. The feeling is that dog listeners are nothing more unqualified instructors riding a fad and making money using old fashioned and outmoded dog training methods. Some feel that dog listening is based on the dominance model, where all behaviour problems are attributed to the dog human relationship being out of balance and the human needing to take charge of the dog.

Well known listeners, who by the nature of what they do are controversial, include the Dog Whisperer, Cesar Millan. The basic premise of bad behaviour can be summed up in this statement from his popular website: Dogs can become aggressive out of frustration and dominance. The frustration comes from a lack of exercise, and the dominance comes from a lack of calm-assertive leadership.

What is interesting about dog listening is that the training focuses on the human rather than solely on the pet. The theory is that the dog is responding to your signals and body language and unless you change its behaviour won’t change.

However, there is some feeling that dog whispering is not the kindest training method and that it uses outdated thinking. One challenge the listeners have is addressing the fact that anyone can give themselves this title without being properly qualified, or recognised, by one of the many accrediting dog training bodies.

What of the dog listeners themselves? To quote well known dog listener, Jan Fennell, “As a Dog Listener, I use the method of Canine Communication which is dog training through understanding and respect, where the dog chooses to cooperate willingly without any use of domination or force”.

This certainly doesn’t sound inhumane or old fashioned on the surface of it. Furthermore, dog listeners claim to work with you and your dog. By using the language of silent signals that every dog understands and not physical force or harsh commands, the dog cooperates of his/her own free will.

Some claim that it is better to consult a qualified dog behavioural expert recommended by your vet and recognised by a national body such as APBC (The Association of Pet Behaviour Counsellors), CABT-COAPE (Association of Pet Behaviorists and Trainers) or the UKRCB (UK Registry of Canine Behaviourists).

However, the wide range of recognised bodies in the dog training world is both overwhelming and controversial and there is not one clear leader in the field. As with choosing any professional, talk to a number of different professional bodies and canine behavioural experts and see who you feel most comfortable with.

Getting a recommendation from your vet is also a good idea and I would always speak to them about your dog’s behaviour, and their recommended local behavioural specialist before making a decision.

Dog listeners such as Jan Fennell claim to understand the psychology of the dog so that bad behaviour can be corrected and the dogs’ fears and anxieties can be alleviated.

Using a method known as Amichien® Bonding dog listeners claim to improve the human dog bond through better understanding, meaning that, as responsible owners, we are better able to see the world from the dogs’ perspective.

By seeing the world through your dog’s eyes the human dog communication can be improved resulting in the removal of confusion, frustration and anxiety for both you and your dog.

From this perspective, it would seem that dog listeners can help dogs and their owners read body language, reduce frustration, improve good manners, canine communication and the general nature of the dog.

The goal of more mutually satisfying human dog interaction is certainly admirable but further in depth research is needed into the methods employed as to whether this is the best way to deal with your dog’s behaviour.

Follow the adventures of Holly the rescue dog at http://www.hollydogblog.com and learn lots of tips and advice on adopting a dog and caring for it.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Cassie_Hicks_Dullea

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6362950

 

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jun 22, 2011 | 0 | Training

Healthy Biscuit Recipes

By Mitch Ross

For people who make homemade dog food, who doesn’t want a healthy biscuit recipe, so they can give their dog a healthy treat? Every dog owner loves to see their canine companion taking a treat and thoroughly ravishing it quickly, ignoring all outside activities to the singular purpose of devouring the treat given.

Only one question needs to be asked. Do you know the ingredients of the treat that you have just given your dog? If you have given your dog a commercially produced treat, then the answer is no. Dog food manufacturers do not have set guidelines on what they have to put on labels of dog food or dog treats. Do not misunderstand me, there are rules and laws they have to follow, but the rules and laws are so vague that manufacturers “confuse” customers by breaking down the parts of ingredients so that when reading the label, the ingredients do not look too bad. The manufacturers do not have to include anything on the label that does not make up 15% of the total volume.

When something like corn is included, they break it down to its various parts such as corn meal, corn flour, corn marrow, etc. The reader has to add all of the ingredients that have part of the same name together, to find out what percentage that ingredient is. Often it is higher than the main item listed. Manufacturers spray treats after being formed, with oil or fats, to keep the shape of the treat. So many things are added to the process of making dog biscuits, that no one would ever know what they are giving their dog.

If you would like to give your dog, a healthy biscuit then put some basic ingredients into a healthy biscuit recipe so that you know what your dog is consuming. These biscuits can supplement what the dog is already eating, bringing variety to their diet. Dogs love this. Dog biscuits not only supply nutrition to your dog, they have health benefits when prepared properly. With a hard, chewy exterior, the biscuit will clean teeth and message gums. This is important in a dogs health since plaque buildup is a sign of poor health in a dog.

When preparing a homemade biscuit adding supplements to the ingredients is an additional way to make sure your dog is getting the proper nutrition they need. You can get the supplements at a local pet store. Make sure you grind the supplements before adding to the recipes so that they can be digested properly. You can grind them in a coffee grinder or put the supplements in a pestle and mortar. Just make sure they are ground enough for easy digestion. Do not add large amounts of supplements, doing so will change the taste of the biscuit. You can also purchase supplements in capsule form. Open the capsule and pour the powder into the dry ingredients of the biscuit mixture.

Healthy Dog Biscuit Recipes:

Crunch Time

Ingredients

2 Cups Whole Wheat Flour
1 Cup Rolled Oats
1 Cup Cooked Brown Rice
1 Cup Cornmeal
1 Cup Rye Flour
1 Cup Shredded Carrots
1 Cup Regular Flour
½ Cup Chopped Nuts
2 Cups Beef Gravy
½ Cup Honey
2 Tablespoons Baking Powder

Heat oven to 300 degrees. In a large bowl combine all dry ingredients. Add in the Beef Gravy, mix until well combined. Add in the Honey mixing until it is well combined. It will be very hard and sticky. Roll out until ½ to 1/3 inch thick. Cut into desired shapes. Place shapes on cookie sheets. Place sheets into oven. Bake for 1 hour. Turn oven off and let biscuits remain in oven overnight (or at least an additional six hours). Remove from oven and store in airtight containers. Biscuits should be hard and chewy for your dog, they will love them.

Peanut Butter Surprise

2 Cups Whole Wheat Flour
1 Cup Peanut Butter
1 Cup Smashed Bananas
1 Cup Cornmeal
1 Cup Rye Flour
2 Cups Water
2 Tablespoons Baking Powder

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Combine all dry ingredients, add in peanut butter mixing until well combined. Add in Smashed Bananas, mix until well combined. Stir in water. Mixture will be inflexible. On a dry surface, flour and roll out mixture until 1/3 to ½ inch thick. Cut into desired shapes. Transfer biscuits to a cookie sheet. Place in oven. Bake for 1 hour. Turn heat off of oven. Let biscuits sit overnight or at least 4 hours until hard. Transfer to an airtight container. Give to your dog when deserving.

Mitch is experienced in raising dogs for a long-time., most of his canine friends have lived long, active lives. He has fed his dogs homemade food for years. To learn more about Healthy Biscuit Recipes go to Healthy Biscuit Recipes where everything you need to know about this topic is available

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mitch_Ross

Randa

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Jun 21, 2011 | 0 | Dog nutrition

Dealing With Pet Grief

By Kelly Marshall

Dogs come into your life, provide companionship, and for many people become a very close friend. Years of romping in the grass, fetching sticks and warming your feet are great, but at some point in time, you are very likely to lose your pet to old age. The typical life span for dogs ranges between 12 to 18 years depending upon the breed in question. When the time comes, dealing with the death of your pet can be very difficult and if you have children, it can be even harder.

Normal Grief

People who do not own pets may not understand your grief, but that does not mean that your grief is unnatural or something to be ashamed of. Feeling pain and loss when a dog dies is natural and has the same stages of grief that you would experience when losing a loved one. Just know you are not crazy or silly to feel pain and grief.

Pet Grief

As stated earlier grief over the loss of a pet is similar to typical grief, the stages are a bit different however. Below are a few of the different feelings you may experience after losing a pet:

  • Guilt – pet owners often blame themselves for a pet’s death, running over in their mind what they could have done to prevent it. This is especially true when the death is the result of an accident.
  • Denial – it will be difficult to imagine that your pet will no longer be there to greet you when you get home from work. This can become extreme and some owners find it hard to accept a new dog out of fear of being disloyal.
  • Depression – grief can lead to depression and can leave you tired and lacking of motivation.
  • Anger – there will be plenty of opportunities to be angry, toward the illness, the driver of the car or even your veterinarian who was unable to cure or save your dog.

 

It is natural for you to experience these feelings; however it is important that you work through these feelings so you can move on.
 
Expression

You will need an outlet for your feelings because bottling them up inside will only make matters worse. Do not try to hide your emotions or deny feelings of guilt, anger or depression. Expression is your road to healing. There are many ways you can express grief, write poems, talk with friends, cry, scream or even pound the floor but get the frustration out of your system.

Conclusion

For the true pet lover the death of a dog is devastating and it can be difficult to explain these feelings to those who are not similar lovers of furry creatures. Remember that these feelings are normal and you have the right to process your grief. If you have children, remember to be understanding, as they will experience the same grief that you will. It is probably not a good idea to try to replace the pet immediately your child may have a hard time bonding with the new pet because of feelings of guilt.

Find hundreds more articles like this at Oh My Dog Supplies – where you can unique dog supplies like affordable dog clothes, dog feeders, and more cool dog gear that you’ll never find at your local pet store.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kelly_Marshall

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

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Jun 20, 2011 | 0 | Grief

Dogs 101: Puppies 101 : First four weeks

The first four weeks for a puppy.

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Randa

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Jun 19, 2011 | 0 | Puppies

Decoding Dog Language

By Jim Castor

Every once in a while, you might hear someone refer to so-called “dog language,” but what exactly are they talking about? Are dogs actually conversing in some secret language that we humans cannot hear?

In reality, dogs don’t think in terms of what we would consider “language”. Language is really a human construct. However, every animal species does use some method of communication, and dogs are no different.

Dogs tell each other what they feel and want primarily by using a series of body language cues and sounds. As human beings, it can be very useful to know what our dogs are trying to say with their body language.

Understanding a dog’s natural method of communication can also help to reduce the potential for aggression. If you can recognize when your dog is upset or angry, you can act to prevent any sort of lashing-out or violence from your pet.

The Various Signs of Dog Language

There is no dictionary or set rule book for dogs about how they “talk” to us, however there are some general physical cues you’ll often receive from your dog. Here are some ideas on how to go about interpreting them:

Stillness

When a dog stops moving and stands very still, it often means they want to be left alone and that they are fearful of losing something. It can be dangerous to try to interact with them in this state (especially if you have not established yourself as the clear leader of the pack in relation to your dog).

Growling and Teeth

There are multiple stages involved in showing a threat. This begins with a dog baring its teeth. Many people tell their dogs to stop doing this, but it’s often best to leave this behavior alone.

Despite how scary it is, baring teeth is simply the first of a progression of clear warning signs to people and animals that a dog is upset and wants to be left alone. Growling comes next, followed by attacking. If you train your dog not to bare its teeth or growl, they may end up escalating straight to attacking instead.

Arched Backs

Dogs will arch their backs when they are trying to look bigger to scare off a threat. This behavior generally means that the dog is scared-and a scared dog is a dangerous dog. If you come across this behavior in another dog, it’s best to leave them alone.

Tail between their Legs

A dog with its tail between its legs is scared or anxious. This can be the result of many things, including something as simple as their owner leaving the house.

Lowered Head

A lowered head is an invitation to play, it is a primal action that says “I’m happy!”

Raised Paw

A raised paw means that the dog wants to be your friend (which is why it is so easy to train a dog to do this as a trick)

Tail Wagging

A dog’s tail is a very powerful communication tool. However, not all tail-wagging denotes the same thing. A loose, wagging tail generally means happiness, but other wagging motions are not necessarily good:

…a flickering tail held mostly still is meant to push away people from bothering him.

…a tail that is barely wagging can mean insecurity or anxiety

…and a dog with a tail between its legs wagging is extremely frightened.

Dogs are extremely expressive animals. Oftentimes, the biggest problem that we’ll have in training our dogs is that we don’t pay attention to what they’re trying to tell us. On the other hand, our dogs will read every gesture we make. Whether we try to hide it or not, a dog will know when we’re upset or happy or angry based almost entirely on our body language.

Your dog may be able to learn to associate actions to some of the sounds and syllables you say, but in the end, it is primarily the body language and gestures you make that will determine how well the two of you communicate.

For more tips on training your dog — or for ideas on how to handle aggression, biting, barking and more — visit Myownjackrussell.com by clicking here: Jack Russell Training

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jim_Castor

Randa

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And you can follow us on twitter too

Jun 17, 2011 | 1 | Understanding Your Dog