Archives for July, 2010

Shiba Inu Training

By Stephanie Gentry

Shiba Inus are playful balls of energy that generally weigh in at less than 25 pounds. Extremely intelligent and loving these dogs make wonderful companions for every age group.The Shiba Inu temperament has often been described as “catlike”. Known for it’s grace and agility, as well as it’s curiosity, this pooch finds more creative ways of getting into trouble than you can even image. You can avoid many of these difficult mishaps with your new pup with proper training, using positive reinforcement.

Proper Way To Train

Correcting a learned behavior is always more difficult than preventing it. Training a Shiba Inu puppy, with love, attention and positive reinforcement will help you to bond, as well as establish your dominance early on in the relationship which will alleviate many potential problems. However, if your dog is older, or you have adopted your friend at a later stage in life, any issue can be corrected with positive reinforcement and patience.

Stop the Barking – The Shiba Scream

A distinguishing characteristic of the breed is the so-called “shiba scream”. When sufficiently provoked or unhappy, the dog will produce a loud, high pitched scream. Though this sound is also made sometimes when the dog is extremely happy, it can be quite unpleasant to you, and to your neighbors. Stopping your Shiba Inu from barkingcan be quite frustrating for both you, and your dog. Luckily, with the right guide and training (for you and your dog):) this can be corrected.

House Training Your Shiba Inu

Like any other dog, your dog needs to be house trained. Again, positive reinforcement will always make you both feel better, and will help you to bond together. Some people eel that a rolled up newspaper or stern “Bad Dog” will help their dog learn not to go in the house. However, just like helping a child potty train, this will just frustrate you, and your dog. Proper training will work a lot better than scare tactics, and help you save your floors.

A Better Way to Train Your Shiba Inu

These are just a few of the training issues associated with owning any dog. Fortunately, you are not alone. There are literally hundreds of ways to train your dog. Many people willing to sell you a product that they claim work. Unfortunately, many of those products or tips don’t work, or require you to be harsh, or raise your voice. Doggy Danis an acclaimed dog trainer who really cares about how you train your dog and how to strengthen your relationship through showing your dominance. Watch his videos for yourself clicking on the link in my bio.

If you want to start building that relationship you have always wanted with your dog start today by clicking on the link in my bio section.

I believe that owning a Shiba Inu should be about Build a Stronger Relationship through positive training.
I have found a professional that can help with that. His name is Doggy Dan. He can help you to Train your Shiba Inu.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Stephanie_Gentry

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 30, 2010 | 0 | Dog breed information, Training

Alpha Dog

By Margene R Smith

Undomesticated dogs lived together in dog packs. These dog packs have one dog that is the leader. Your dog sees your family as his pack. It is natural for a dog to want to be the pack leader. Your dog will attempt to take on the position as the pack leader, or alpha dog, if you have not assumed that role.

The leader, within the pack, makes all the major decisions. The attention of the dogs in the pack is entirely on their leader. He is constantly defending his position. Usually the alpha leader will never give up his position voluntarily.

Is it clear who the alpha dog is in your family? If it is not you, your dog will take on the leadership role. In a pack gender is not the determining factor for the alpha leader, although, since females tend to be smaller in size male dogs are more often the leader. If the position of alpha leader is left vacant a female dog will assume the role. If your dog takes on the role of the alpha dog leader life within your family can become extremely difficult.

When your dog feels that he is the alpha leader, within your family, he will exhibit bad or destructive behavior. Pulling on a leash, chasing, and aggression are all examples of a dog feeling he is the alpha dog in his sphere of influence.

If your dog begins to think of himself as your equal it is because he is confused as to who is the alpha dog. Leadership qualities must be demonstrated by you at all times. You demonstrate leadership by your tone of voice, body language and an air of confidence. If you want to be accepted as the alpha leader you must feel comfortable in that role.

The alpha leader maintains his dominance through small deliberate acts. For instance, he is always the first one in the pack to eat. There may be little to eat when it is finally the packs turn. Also, the alpha dog will nudge his way through the pack instead of going around. The alpha leader controls the things that are within the pack’s sphere of influence.

Why is it important to understand what the role of an alpha dog does in a pack? Why should you be concerned with the pack’s hierarchy? The answer to that question is obvious. As you emulate the practices of an alpha dog you will become the alpha leader. As a result, your dog will look to you for guidance. Keep in mind that this does not require force or physical or verbal abuse of any kind.

The best time to establish yourself as the alpha leader is with a puppy. Although it is easy to establish alpha leadership with a puppy that does not mean that you must continually work at keeping your position. Being an alpha dog requires a twenty-four hour commitment.

Your dog wants to look to you as his leader. Establishing your position as the alpha dog leader is essential to training your dog effectively.

Margene R. Smith believes that positive dog training makes for a happier dog and a satisfied dog owner.

Learn how to establish yourself as the leader by checking out alpha dog leader.

You might also want to check out the free 6-part mini course and dog training reviews at http://www.dogsecretsdiscovered.com/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Margene_R_Smith

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 29, 2010 | 0 | dog behavior, Understanding Your Dog

Michael Vick’s Dogs: From Fighters to Family Pets

Michael Vick’s former fighting dogs on the path to becoming family pets

YouTube Preview Image

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 28, 2010 | 0 | Rescue Dogs, Videos

How Should You Deal With Your Dog’s Food Aggression?

By Abby Parker

Dog food aggression is a behavior that is unacceptable and a matter of serious concern especially if it is not rectified. It may cause a problem if the dog exhibits this kind of aggressive behavior as he interacts with people and dogs. A good dog behavior training is very helpful and it will give you information on the reasons behind this type of behavior.

The behavior of being “the leader of the pack” which your dog learned as a puppy may have been brought into your home. Other odd and unacceptable behaviors such as barking too loud and excessive chewing are signs of a confused perception by the dog of his perceived relationship with you. Establish early in the relationship who is the boss – it is you, and not your dog who runs things in the household.

Dogs who have been in animal shelters rescued from conditions may exhibit dog food aggression. They may have learned this behavior while in the shelter, because food was scarce and they may have started developing a fear that the food served today may not be there tomorrow. Take note of the possibility that your dog may be showing this kind of behavior out of fear that the food being served to him will be his last meal.

Observe your dogs’ behavior towards other people or dogs as this problem maybe symptomatic of other problems or issues. You can help your dog overcome dog food aggression with short walks to help him relate with both dogs and people outside of your home. A walk is also a good form of exercise which maybe what he needs so as not to feel too much excited or nervous.

Here’s a list on how you would be able to deal with dog food aggression:

1. Establish eating rules for your dog. It can help to train your dog to wait for you to finish eating before he gets his meal. This is a method you can teach the dog to honor you as his leader. Make this rule known to everybody in your home and make them understand that doing so will train your dog and will teach him to obey household rules.

2. If you believe that his dog food aggression is prominent when he is in the company of other dogs, put him aside and let the other dogs enjoy their meal.

3. It is actually easier to make puppies understand that having you or other dogs around during meals is nothing to be afraid of. This method will make them believe that they do not need to protect their meals even with strangers or dogs around.

4. Do not be aggressive towards your dogs or become violent every time the dog show this behavior.

Observe your dog as you implement the steps outlined above and it should stop another incidence of dog food aggression.

Abby Parker has been writing articles professionally for more than 3 years. Not only this author writes in the subject of health, but also in hair loss, beauty, golf and many other more. Check out her latest website in litter locker plus which discusses and explains about feline pine cat litter.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Abby_Parker

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 27, 2010 | 0 | dog behavior, Tips

Why Do Dogs Eat Grass?

By Andrea Arden

There is no definitive answer to why dogs eat grass. However, a survey of 1,600 pet parents conducted by the University of California-Davis may give some insight.

It has been suggested that dogs may eat grass because they don’t feel well. As many dogs throw up after ingesting plant material, some believe this may be a way for the dog to rid their system of what is causing them to feel ill.

But, of the 1,600 pet parents in the study, 68% of them said their dogs eat plants daily or weekly. Only 8% said their dogs had exhibited signs of illness prior to eating the plant material. So, it seems there is probably no basis for the hypothesis that dogs eat plants because they don’t feel well. Yet, others still suggest that dogs may eat plant or grass material because they have inherited the instinct to do so from their wild ancestors who did so to clean their intestines of potential parasites.

This behavior might be due in part to the fact that dogs investigate with their mouths (and noses, of course) and grass and plants smell and taste good to them. But, things don’t need to necessarily taste ‘good’ for a dog to eat it (after all they’ll scavenge in the kitty litter box and pick up cigarette butts from the street!).

It could be that dogs get the occasional craving for greens since they are omnivores (they eat meat and plants). Some vets suggest that eating grass may indicate the dog needs a higher fiber diet. So, you might want to chat with them about that and potentially offer your dog a different food and/or some veggies.

There is usually no reason to worry about the occasional ingestion of grass as long as it isn’t coated with potentially toxic chemicals (like fertilizer). But, if you feel your dog is heading straight to the grass to eat each time you take him out you might want to chat with your veterinarian to rule out any medical issues.

Andrea is a Certified Pet Dog Trainer through the Certification Council for Pet Dog Trainers and a Certified Pet Partners Team evaluator for the Delta Society and the AKC’s Canine Good Citizen (CGC) test. She is the Director of Andrea Arden Dog Training in New York, and was named the best dog trainer in New York by New York, W, Time Out, Quest and the Daily News. Her website is located at http://www.andreaarden.com and she can be reached at 212-414-9597. You can follow her on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/andreaardendogtraining.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Andrea_Arden

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 26, 2010 | 0 | Dog health

Update on Charlie the Puppy – Advice from Animal Behaviourist, Dr Joanne Righetti

Charlie the puppy with her friend Sasha

Yesterday, we gave you an update on Charlie the puppy and included advice from dogLOGIC’s Trudi. Today we share the same parts of Angelique’s update but offer an animal behaviourist’s advice – Dr Joanne Righetti.

Angelique:

Charlies doing well. She’s 15 weeks now. She’s finished puppy school but I’d like her to go to obedience training with the girls at dog logic in a little while.

She still gets car sick in the back. I’ve had her in the front with me now or a passenger for a while to get her over the car sickness and enjoy the car trips in general which she does now but I have to put her In a capsule eventually for safety. I just got one delivered but haven’t tried it out and not sure if it’s suitable but that would have to be in the front seat so she’s not vomiting…..

Her toilet training is going well, she basically goes outside now and that’s great. She stands at the door if it’s closed and I let her out so very proud of that. She still bites hands and tries biting other dogs legs thinking she’s playing but I can’t seem to break this habit. I intervene and she stops but she just does it again out of habit and excitement.

Dr Jo

Providing no one is getting hurt, the ways sogs play with one another can be rough and includes playful biting. Biting at kegs is often a way of getting the other dog to roll over. Let dogs play and only step in if one is getting annoyed or hurt.

Angelique

I’m trying to get her used to the lead. She’s had her final vaccination so this week she has been out every day exploring the street, walking, smelling the plants, the grass, the flowers, everything basically. A walk down the street takes about 2 hours. She walks a little with the lead, then stops, smells things. I try to say”come on Charlie, this way” but she is stubborn and decides she doesn’t want to walk. I’ve been told it’s ok to drag them but then I feel terrible doing it as I’m worried it hurts them or people may think I’m nasty.

Dr Jo

You might like to try a head halter or a different leading device so there is less pulling. Controlling the dogs head helps direct the walk. Try to make walking beside you more motivating than sniffing by having tasty, smelly treats with you. Part of the enjoyment for dogs is the smelling of scents so allow this when it is conveneient for you but you should always stay in control of the walks (and walk if you want to).

Angelique

She’s in a harness when I walk her with the lead so she doesn’t hurt her neck from pulling.

I get her to stop and sit at each gutter to try and get her used to stopping at the road but when I say “go” or come on Charlie, she pulls that face, takes a stance and doesn’t want to walk so I have to drag her as I don’t want her stopping in the middle of the road. So I’m battling a little with the lead training and street walking. She knows the biscuit thing now so that doesn’t work putting that near her nose. I take her squeaky toy with me and that works at times but not always. Basically I have to walk and stop, walk and stop until she’s ready to continue walking.

Dr Jo

If training your dog is hard in a particular location (and for most people walking outdoors is the dog’s domain therefore they often don’t listen to owners), work on it away from this location until your dog responds. Then gradually move away from your comfort zone. With a young dog it can take time to get the walks happening the way you’d like them to. And some events eg. seeing a cat, may make even the best trained dogs pull on the lead.

Angelique

Is this a normal thing? Or am I not doing something right?

Dr Jo

Most owners find walking their dog quite difficult especially when they are young.

Angelique

When I have her off the lead, she loves it and walks next to me and doesn’t stop. If I run, she runs too but on the lead she won’t run with me…, very strange.

Dr Jo

It is difficult to match paces when on a lead. There is also no option for escape which makes it a daunting experience for some dogs.

Angelique

She has also recently learnt how to climb up and down stairs so that we can go for walks. At times though. I still have to wait there and convince her to come down them or up them (6levels) and so I can’t ever be in a rush.

Dr Jo

Check that she is not sore when walking up and dwon stairs and make it as enticing as possible.

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 24, 2010 | 0 | A++++ Watching Charlie The Pup Grow, Puppies

Update on Charlie the Puppy – Advice from dogLOGIC (Dog Trainers)

I have been keen to find out how young Charlie the pup has been going. Angelique, her owner, has sent the following update so we’ve checked in with Dr Joanne Righetti and Trudi to help with some expert behavioural and puppy training tips and advice based on some current concerns. All puppy owners will benefit from their expert advice. Today, hear from Trudi at dogLOGIC – tomorrow, we’ll hear Dr Joanne Righetti’s thoughts.

Angelique:

Charlies doing well. She’s 15 weeks now. She’s finished puppy school but I’d like her to go to obedience training with the girls at dogLOGIC in a little while”.

She still gets car sick in the back…. I’ve had her in the front with me now or a passenger for a while to get her over the car sickness and enjoy the car trips in general which she does now but I have to put her In a capsule eventually for safety…. I just got one delivered but haven’t tried it out and not sure if it’s suitable but that would have to be in the front seat so she’s not vomiting.

Trudi - dogLOGIC:
Puppies often grow out of car sickness with time, so it’s best to persevere.  Dogs are now required by law to travel in the back seat of the car and not impede in any way on the driver.  It is up to the discretion of the Police officers as to whether or not they believe the dog to be a distraction or a danger and if so, the driver will incur both a fine and a loss of demerit points.  Also, if your car is fitted with airbags and they are activated whilst Charlie is in the front seat, there is a high likelihood of her being killed by the airbag.  The capsule sounds like a great idea but it is important to habituate Charlie to the capsule before putting her in it in the car so that she enjoys being in it before you even use it in the car.  She needs to feel safe and happy inside it so that it doesn’t add to the anxiety of the car sickness whilst travelling.

Angelique:

Her toilet training is going well, she basically goes outside now and that’s great…. She stands at the door if it’s closed and I let her out so very proud of that….. She still bites hands and tries biting other dogs legs thinking she’s playing but I can’t seem to break this habit…. I intervene and she stops but she just does it again out of habit and excitement….
Mouthing is a natural puppy behaviour and they usually grow out of it at around 5-6 months.  This is a behaviour that needs to be managed rather than trained.  Mouthing is Charlie’s way of interacting with you and other dogs.  She doesn’t have hands so she grabs a hold with her mouth.  If you reprimand her for mouthing, she will likely associate the reprimand with the fact that she is interacting with you NOT the fact that we find the behaviour inappropriate.  There are a number of ways that you can manage mouthing; play calmly with her and don’t hype her up, if you play rough with her this will increase her excitement level and encourage the mouthing behaviour. Grab a toy and play with her, if she’s on the end of a toy she’s not on the end of you!  Get a ball and roll it slowly across the floor, puppies love movement and if she’s going after the ball, she’s not going after you!  Distract her with something interesting like an empty tissue box or the inside cardboard roll of the toilet paper, if she’s chewing on a box she’s not chewing on you!  Another thing you can do is create a “time out” area for her to go into.  Put her in there with a chew and some toys to keep her occupied so that she has some own time.  Unlike children, a time out area is not an area where she goes to think about what she’s done wrong – nor is it a punishment spot, it is simply a place to put her to give YOU some time out from her where she can calm down.  This should always be made to be a positive place.

Angelique:
I’m trying to get her used to the lead….. She’s had her final vaccination so this week she has been out every day exploring the street, walking, smelling the plants, the grass, the flowers, everything basically….. A walk down the street takes about 2 hours…… She walks a little with the lead, then stops, smells things…. I try to say” come on Charlie, this way” but she is stubborn and decides she doesn’t want to walk…. I’ve been told it’s ok to drag them but then I feel terrible doing it as I’m worried it hurts them or people may think I’m nasty…..

Trudi – dogLOGIC:


Whatever you do, DON’T force or drag her!  She is just a baby and needs to be able to explore the outside world.  All of the smells, sights and sounds are new and interesting and she needs to be able to investigate them at her own pace.  It’s not so important just now for her to walk in a matter of fact, functional way, it is more important that she builds her confidence in new surroundings so that she becomes desensitised to noises and movement and anything else the outside world throws at her.  Take your time with her on lead, allow her to get used to being on it in a positive way.  If she does stop and doesn’t want to move forward, firstly loosen up on the lead and try to encourage her along using a squeaky toy or maybe a food treat. Dragging her will only make the whole walking process unpleasant for her and can even lead to her not wanting to go for a walk at all.

 Angelique:

She’s in a harness when I walk her with the lead so she doesn’t hurt her neck from pulling.

Trudi – dogLOGIC:


A harness is good but better may be a Front Attach Harness.  These harnesses fit like a normal one, but the lead attaches to the front of the harness at the chest of the dog.  They are really great for pullers and work with the dog’s “opposition reflex” (pulling forward or backward into the lead) and assists in teaching the dog to loose lead walk.

Angelique:

I get her to stop and sit at each gutter to try and get her used to stopping at the road but when I say “go” or come on Charlie, she pulls that face, takes a stance and doesn’t want to walk so I have to drag her as I don’t want her stopping in the middle of the road….. So I’m battling a little with the lead training and street walking….. She knows the biscuit thing now so that doesn’t work putting that near her nose…., I take her squeaky toy with me and that works at times but not always….. Basically I have to walk and stop, walk and stop until she’s ready to continue walking…..

Is this a normal thing? Or am I not doing something right?

Trudi – dogLOGIC:
The stopping and starting is usually as a direct result of the dragging.  Try upping the anti with food and take bbq chicken with you.  Make sure you cross the road where you can do so with plenty of time so that you don’t need to drag. Encourage her to move with you and make sure that you don’t put ANY pressure on that lead.  If you can’t lure her forward with the chicken, drop some on the ground in front of her to get her up and moving.  Take your time working with her on the lead – it may take some time, but getting it right will be SO worth it in the long run. If she just won’t move forward, just whilst you’re training her pick her up and walk across the rest of the road to avoid dragging at all costs.

Angelique:
When I have her off the lead, she loves it and walks next to me and doesn’t stop…. If I run, she runs too but on the lead she won’t run with me…, very strange…..

Trudi – dogLOGIC:
This is once again as a direct result of dragging her.  Take your time and she will eventually run, walk, and trot beside you on lead. And be careful with having her off lead near roads whilst she still a baby. Whilst she may be glued to you at the moment it won’t be long before the big wide world starts to look more exciting and she may run off to check out a smell or try to cross a busy road to chase something on the other side.

Angelique:
She has also recently learnt how to climb up and down stairs so that we can go for walks….. At times though…. I still have to wait there and convince her to come down them or up them (6levels) and so I can’t ever be in a rush……

Trudi – dogLOGIC:

Don’t rush her, she will get better and faster with time.  Once again, use a high value treat to encourage her along.  In all cases, encouraging and positively rewarding the behaviours you want and like will be a lot more effective than forcing her into doing them.  Be patient and calm with her to encourage confidence in all situations and there will be no stopping you!

Angelique:


Hopefully this will just improve……

that’s pretty much the update really…. She seems to be going well….. She’s a lot of joy really and very cute

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 23, 2010 | 0 | A++++ Watching Charlie The Pup Grow, Puppies, Training

Grooming Needs of a Lhasa Apso

By Lea Mullins

Grooming your Lhasa Apso need not be a challenging task when you start grooming them from a young age. This way they become accustomed to it as a part of their life. Although puppies don’t need a lot of grooming but it is useful to incorporate it after their general training as they become tired and quiet.

Dog grooming is essential for this breed as their coat can become matted and tangled. You’ll need to brush their coat in layers and start from the stomach and work towards the inner front legs then back legs. Then moving to the outside of the legs and brushing the undercoat and working towards the top coat and back. Don’t forget the chest, neck and ears, then finishing with the head and face.

There is a wide variety of tools you can use to groom your Lhasa Apso but the basics are scissors, toe clippers, latex elastic bands similar to ones use on braces, hair dryer, anti static solution, a detangler or diluted crème, pin brush and gentle slick brush, and a double sided comb with narrow and wide teeth. It is best to brush out any matting or tangles before bathing them as they may become difficult to remove.

Most Lhasa Apsos have a thick eyefall that generally needs to be pulled away from their eyes. Latex bands can be used to pull eyefall into a topknot hairstyle which is popular with some males or the other option is to use barrettes. Coat oil, detangler or conditioner helps remove matting and tangles, making it easier to style or braid.

Every so often their ears become thick with hair and require it to be removed. This helps to keep their ears healthy and infection free.

Bathing your Lhasa Apso requires a simple technique of applying and squeezing shampoo through the coat in a downwards motion. Massaging in a circular motion as most of us do with our own hair can cause tangles. Use a towel to dry them off squeezing or blotting out the excess water, avoid rubbing the coat with the towel as this can also cause tangles. Once you have the majority of the moisture removed use a hair dryer at a comfortable temp and speed to dry the rest of the coat.

Grooming your Lhasa Apso is important to keep your pet looking healthy, clean and avoid unsightly matting and knots. It is also a great way to bond with them. So for a happy and healthy pet groom them regularly.

Lea Mullins presents tips on how to groom a Lhasa Apso. Learn more about Dog grooming from TrainPetDog.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lea_Mullins

For registered Lhasa Apos breeders in Australia visit the dogs and cats directory.

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 20, 2010 | 0 | Dog breed information, Dog grooming

Tips to Avoid Dog Shedding

By Steph Jones

Dog shedding can be a terrible experience for both a pet and its owner. Dog shedding is when your dog starts to loose hair due to different causes- specifically allergies. No pet owner likes to see their pet dog suffer like that just because they have allergies which they have no control over. Here are some tips that you can use to prevent dog shedding.

First, use an effective shampoo against fleas and ticks. These parasites irritate your pet’s skin which causes it to scratch more. By doing this, the dog irritates its skin more thus causing its hair to fall off. When purchasing a shampoo for your dog, be sure to buy one that fights off fleas and ticks. By getting rid of fleas and ticks, you are more likely to be successful in alleviating your dog’s shedding problems.

Allergies can also be caused by the foods that your dog eats. It may be suffering from dog shedding if it has eaten something that it is allergic to. So be sure that you are feeding only the right foods for your dog. You may check the label of the dog food you are about to serve it and see if it contains all natural ingredients; these are healthier and tend to suppress allergic reactions.

Lastly, hygiene and good grooming is important. This will keep the skin of your pet healthy and away from allergies or irritants. Aside from bathing your dog, you should also check for signs of fleas or ticks. If they are present, you should change the shampoo to a better brand. Also brush your dog’s hair and keep it trimmed regularly. Keeping your pet clean and well groomed can avoid irritants and dog shedding. This will give your pet a healthy skin and fur all the time.

Some pet owners even bring their dogs to a pet parlor where their dogs actually go through their clean up day. This is good if you have the money for it; but if you are in a tight budget, you can do the grooming by yourself and get rid of dog shedding.

For a free 1 week of doggy daycamp at Fort Worth Veterinarian, visit www.a-animal.com today for more information!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Steph_Jones

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 19, 2010 | 0 | Dog grooming

Tribute to Movie Dogs – Rin Tin Tin Lassie Benji Asta Toto +

YouTube Preview Image

Learn more about dogs in movies at: http://reeldogs.blogspot.com -

Some pieces from my movie dog collection in a slideshow dating from the earliest days of film to modern times. Song is Dog Dreams, by The Story.

Please comment! Thanks for watching!

In order the images are:
1. Blair from the 1905 short film Rescued by Rover, first canine movie star.
2. Strongheart, from a painting by Charles Livingston Bull.
3. Newspaper clipping from 1925 Rin-Rin-Tin film Below the Line.
4. Photo of the original Rin-Tin-Tin.
5. Rin-Tin-Tin Jr. lobby card from The Wolf Dog.
6. One-sheet poster of Tracked with Ranger the German Shepherd Dog.
7. Ad for A Dog of Flanders with Lightning, Strongheart’s grandson.
8. Teddy the Great Dane and Jackie Coogan in A Boy of Flanders.
9. Lobby card from Detective K-9 with Fearless, another GSD.
10. Pete the Pup from the Our Gang (Little Rascals) shorts.
11. Ad for Under the Black Eagle with GSD Flash.
12. Terry (Toto) the Cairn Terrier and Judy Garland.
13. Silver Wolf the GSD on the set of Radio Patrol.
14. Captain and Lady on a lobby card for Fighting to Live.
15. Asta the Wire Fox Terrier with Myrna Loy and William Powell.
16. One-sheet poster from Shaggy.
17. Lassie.
18. Pal (Lassie) and Roddy McDowall.
19. Lassie tie-in books.
20. Lobby card from Kazan with Zorro the white GSD.
21. Lobby card from My Dog Rusty with Flame.
22. Flame (Rusty) and Ted Donaldson
23. Three-sheet from Shep Comes Home with Flame.
24. Lobby card from Ole Rex.
25. Half-sheet poster from Big Dog Lost, aka Big Jeeter.
26. One-sheet from A Dog’s Best Friend.
27. Chinook the white GSD on one-sheet for Fangs of the Arctic.
28. Chinook on a three-sheet for Snow Dog.
29. Half-sheet for The Silent Call with Spike, the Lab/Mastiff mix who played Old Yeller.
30. Lobby card from The Secret of Magic Island.
31. One-sheet from The Boy and the Laughing Dog, aka Good-bye, My Lady, with a Basenji.
32. Lobby card from The Littlest Hobo with London the GSD.
33. London from The Littlest Hobo, and family.
34. Novelizations of Summerdog, My Dog the Thief, Digby; the Biggest Dog in the World, and The Shaggy Dog, along with a movie edition of Old Yeller.
35. Old Yeller rerelease one-sheet.
36. The Incredible Journey insert poster.
37. Big Red insert poster.
38. Nikki; Wild Dog of the North, aka Nomads of the North, rerelease one-sheet.
39. Lad: a Dog insert poster.
40. Kelly and Me lobby card.
41. MoonWolf one-sheet.
42. Digby; the Biggest Dog in the World half-sheet.
43. Photo from Monster on the Campus.
44. They Only Kill Their Masters insert poster.
45. C.H.O.P.S. insert poster.
46. Italian posters for The Call of the Wild, Siblings of the Wind, and There was a Castle with Forty Dogs.
47. Photo from Won Ton Ton; The Dog Who Saved Hollywood.
48. Summerdog one-sheet poster.
49. Photo from The Pack.
50. Italian poster from Antarctica.
51. For the Love of Benji one-sheet.
52. Benji with trainer Frank Inn on the set of Benji the Hunted.
53. Benji the Hunted one-sheet.
54. Benji off the Leash one-sheet.
55. Books: 101 Dalmatians, 102 Dalmatians, Benji of the Leash, Because of Winn-Dixie, Firehouse Dog, Benji, For the Love of Benji, Cujo, To Dance with a White Dog, White Fang II, Zeus and Roxanne.
56. Lobby card from K-9.
57. We Think the World of You one-sheet.
58. Betsy the long haired GSD and Alan Bates.
59. Australian Cattle Dog in The Road Worrier.
60. Movies: Where the Red Fern Grows, Dusty, Little Heroes, The Amazing Dobermans, Turner & Hooch, The Call of the Wild.
61. The Journey of Natty Gann one-sheet.
62. White Fang one-sheet.
63. Iron Will mini poster.
64. Bingo movie cover.
65. Comet the Golden Retriever (in makeup) with Matthew Modine in the movie Fluke.
66. Photo from Beethoven’s 2nd.
67. Air Bud movie cover.
68. Shiloh, My Dog Skip, Cats & Dogs.
69. Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco novelization.
70. Chihuahua with Reese Witherspoon in Legally Blonde.
71. Snow Dogs one-sheet.
72. Good Boy! one-sheet.
73. Because of Winn-Dixie one-sheet.
74. Huskies from Eight Below on DVD store display box.
75. The Shaggy Dog one-sheet.
76. Firehouse Dog DVD release one-sheet poster.
77. Underdog vinyl banner.

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 18, 2010 | 1 | Miscellaneous, Videos