Archives for A++++ Watching Charlie The Pup Grow category

Charlie’s All Grown Up

Angelique has kindly sent this photo which i just had to share with you. You may remember us following Charlie from puppyhood and answering some of Angelique’s queries and concerns (see the posts in A +++++ Watching Charlie the Pup Grow).

This is Charlie now with her favourite new toy called Todd which is all the way from New York.

I’m sure we’ll be hearing more about Charlie’s adventures soon.

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Mar 20, 2012 | 0 | A++++ Watching Charlie The Pup Grow

Charlie the Puppy has Turned One!! – We’ve Been Watching Charlie Grow

Charlie Has Turned 1!

I wrote to Angelique recently to see how Charlie was coming along. We’ve been following Charlie since she was a tiny puppy.

“Well Charlie and I are both doing well. I realized brushing her teeth (as much as she hates it) is a good thing as the yellow plaque goes immediately and they dont smell, said Angelique.

“There was a period of time she kept vomiting every 4-6 weeks. The vet said she could any number of things so she went on a bland I/d diet for six weeks. She settled but I actually think I worked out that the problem was – One, not too much cooked meat (especially lamb) oops – annnndddd ..she had a toy with two small tennis balls at the end of each rope end and she would chew the fur of the tennis balls. When I took that toy away each time there was no vomiting. Sooooo Maybe she ate the fur that got food caught in her digestive system somewhere or the chemicals from the material react with her causing her to vomit.

It’s gone now so I rarely give her toys like that to play with. I confiscated it basically. A very expensive lesson but insurance with Bow Wow Meow has proven to be amazing as I got all the money I spent back and it was over $2000. That’s a 100% return. I highly recommended pet insurance!

She has learnt to wee and defacate outside but occasionally there are still suprises inside during the night. I’m unsure why she does that but maybe there’s a noise outside that stops her from going out?.. Who knows? Maybe the bats…. But she can’t hold onto it all night yet. She’s getting better though as sometimes she can…..

I’ve been taking her to the groomers instead of grooming her myself and this is actually a good thing. They get her nails clipped alot shorter than I do. She’s always excited to come home too as she doesn’t like getting washed, etc. She sits still though so that’s great.

When I take her to the beach, or water/rocks, she’s scared of the water and I think that is because I still bath her and not shower her and she looks at water as torture rather than pleasure. It would be awesome if she could love to want to swim and just jump in..

We recently went to the mountains and I put the tick gel on her and so amongst all the bush walking, she remained free from ticks and fleas.

I had stopped giving her the flea tablets a while ago as I didn’t think I had to give them to her every month after six months but lucky I asked and she is now on the monthly dose of flea/worm tablets which is good.

She loves other dogs, and is very social – she doesn’t care what size they are, she loves them all……. and people….. She’s a gem!

If I need to discipline her, she always knows that she’s done something wrong and does a little wee in the corner.. I take it this is normal behavior when they fret? She doesn’t do it when she’s excited but when she gets into trouble she does….

She listens really well, only barks when she plays or wants to play so that’s good.

She is becoming a little more fussier with food. I’m getting all sorts of stories about her food. Some say she should just stick to puppy science diet biscuits as they’re enough….

But I like exposing her to the joy of other foods too. Especially when she stares at me the whole time. I give her raw chicken necks at times – some say these are good and some not. I give her both raw and cooked chicken in moderation as she looovvveeee chicken!

I give her those greenie treats for her teeth and she loves the king kong peanut butter treats.

I avoid giving her chocolate, onion, raisins, grapes, and potato. I think they’re the main no no’s and any meat cooked in spices is a no no too.

That’s pretty much all of it. I can’t think of anything else. She doesn’t throw up in the car that much anymore which is great but I still have to have her in the front, securely in the front. I would like to know the exact law around animals in the car as I don’t know it. Different stories again.

Charlies 1st birthday was March 18 so she’s getting older and cuter too”, Angelique said..

Happy Birthday Charlie from us here at Dogs and Cats!

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Mar 31, 2011 | 3 | A++++ Watching Charlie The Pup Grow

Charlie the Puppy – More Toilet Training Tips

I recently checked in with Angelique about Charlie the puppy to see how she was coming along Angelique has never had a puppy before so it’s all been a new experience. Angelique gave a general update and is still having some toilet training issues so below you’ll find Angelique’s update along with advice from dogLOGIC’s Trudi and animal behaviourist’s advice – Dr Joanne Righetti.

Angelique:

Charlie got desexed on Monday. She seems to be going OK. She was walking awkwardly for 48 hours post but seems to be nearly back into the swing of things again. I hated the fact she was in pain and so out of it. I haven’t had to put her in a head collar so that’s good. I put some anti lick stuff near the wound so that probably helped and I have an outfit that’s perfect for covering the wound so she can’t access it so easily but without putting pressure on it or rubbing it so kind of ok…..

Her Walks to the park are much easier now she’s used to the lead. She’s obedient and fun-loving so I can’t ask for more. She can sit and shake which is very cute.

Today she piddled on the carpet several times here and out at another place and it isn’t like her to be like that so unsure why that’s happening

I think maybe because others don’t discipline her when she does it and she thinks it’s OK. Not sure….

It’s starting to stain the carpet in my room only even after I put stuff on it so not sure whether a steam clean will help that?

Or will I have to replace the carpet. It’s dark grey and only under two years old so I’m sure the landlord won’t be impressed..
I have the piddle pads down but she pees next to them, not on them….. She poohs on the piddle pads but her wees just don’t make it..

Don’t know how to solve this one. It’s clear that she likes an area and doesn’t really pay attention to piddle pads. Occasionally she gets on them.

Trudi wrote:

With toilet training comes a number of very important facts that you need to be aware of. To start, there is no such thing as a half toilet trained dog – they either get the concept or they don’t. It is also important to understand that Charlie has absolutely no concept of what a house is, therefore if you reprimand her in any way, shape or form when she eliminates in the wrong spot, she will always associate the reprimand with the fact that she went to the toilet and NOT that she went to the toilet inside the house. That is far too complex for her to be able to work out. Reprimanding her will only make her fearful of going to the toilet in front of you and she will therefore become secretive when she needs to go. She will wait until your back is turned, or go into another room or go behind the couch etc. The reason she is picking the carpet is because dogs are very sub-strata or surface conscious. This means that if given the choice, they will pee on carpet, a rug or mat rather than a hard surface like wood or tiles.

To successfully toilet train Charlie, it is imperative that you have patience, persistence, consistency, understanding and a good sense of humour to help you through this period. Toilet training requires her to understand a concept, and that concept is to go to a designated spot (be it outside in the garden or inside on a piddle pad) when she feels the need to eliminate. In order to build an association between a full bladder and emptying it in the correct place, you first need to condition this association. This is done through monitoring her and taking her to the spot every time she needs to go. Try not to carry her, but encourage her to walk to where she needs to go to assist in building that association. Particularly concentrate on the times that you KNOW she is going to have to go, like straight after she wakes up from a sleep, after playtime and 10 minutes or so after she eats or drinks. Outside of these times, watch her and take her to her designated spot every 2 hours or so and just stand there quietly until she goes. Praise her lavishly each time she gets it right. If she has an accident and goes anywhere other than where she is supposed to, DO NOT REPRIMAND – if you find you need to take it out on someone, simply grab a newspaper, roll it up and hit yourself over the head for not monitoring her close enough and then clean it up with no fuss. When you are not in a position to monitor her, confine her either in a puppy pen or behind a baby gate in the laundry or the bathroom or just somewhere that is tiled so that if she does go firstly, you know it and secondly, it is easy to clean up. Toilet training is time consuming but done the right way, it won’t be long before Charlie gets the concept and will go in the right spot for the rest of her life.

Dr Joanne Righetti wrote:

Best solutions is to look at the reason why the dog is using the carpet. Obviously first thing to rule out is urinary tract problems so do ask your vet.

Does she favour carpet as a substrate? Can you change form pee pads to a different substrate? A pet loo?

Check that the area you wish her to go is ‘safe’ for her.Dogs need to feel secure as they toilet. Her favoured area may have some factor that appeals to her.

Deter her from peeing in unwanted areas by feeding her there or playing with her. But remember she will be looking for elsewhere to pee.

Monitor every toileting episode for 2 weeks – it’s like going back to the beginning.

Clean carpets thoroughly using Urine Off.

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Sep 08, 2010 | 0 | A++++ Watching Charlie The Pup Grow, Puppies

Update on Charlie the Puppy – Advice from Animal Behaviourist, Dr Joanne Righetti

Charlie the puppy with her friend Sasha

Yesterday, we gave you an update on Charlie the puppy and included advice from dogLOGIC’s Trudi. Today we share the same parts of Angelique’s update but offer an animal behaviourist’s advice – Dr Joanne Righetti.

Angelique:

Charlies doing well. She’s 15 weeks now. She’s finished puppy school but I’d like her to go to obedience training with the girls at dog logic in a little while.

She still gets car sick in the back. I’ve had her in the front with me now or a passenger for a while to get her over the car sickness and enjoy the car trips in general which she does now but I have to put her In a capsule eventually for safety. I just got one delivered but haven’t tried it out and not sure if it’s suitable but that would have to be in the front seat so she’s not vomiting…..

Her toilet training is going well, she basically goes outside now and that’s great. She stands at the door if it’s closed and I let her out so very proud of that. She still bites hands and tries biting other dogs legs thinking she’s playing but I can’t seem to break this habit. I intervene and she stops but she just does it again out of habit and excitement.

Dr Jo

Providing no one is getting hurt, the ways sogs play with one another can be rough and includes playful biting. Biting at kegs is often a way of getting the other dog to roll over. Let dogs play and only step in if one is getting annoyed or hurt.

Angelique

I’m trying to get her used to the lead. She’s had her final vaccination so this week she has been out every day exploring the street, walking, smelling the plants, the grass, the flowers, everything basically. A walk down the street takes about 2 hours. She walks a little with the lead, then stops, smells things. I try to say”come on Charlie, this way” but she is stubborn and decides she doesn’t want to walk. I’ve been told it’s ok to drag them but then I feel terrible doing it as I’m worried it hurts them or people may think I’m nasty.

Dr Jo

You might like to try a head halter or a different leading device so there is less pulling. Controlling the dogs head helps direct the walk. Try to make walking beside you more motivating than sniffing by having tasty, smelly treats with you. Part of the enjoyment for dogs is the smelling of scents so allow this when it is conveneient for you but you should always stay in control of the walks (and walk if you want to).

Angelique

She’s in a harness when I walk her with the lead so she doesn’t hurt her neck from pulling.

I get her to stop and sit at each gutter to try and get her used to stopping at the road but when I say “go” or come on Charlie, she pulls that face, takes a stance and doesn’t want to walk so I have to drag her as I don’t want her stopping in the middle of the road. So I’m battling a little with the lead training and street walking. She knows the biscuit thing now so that doesn’t work putting that near her nose. I take her squeaky toy with me and that works at times but not always. Basically I have to walk and stop, walk and stop until she’s ready to continue walking.

Dr Jo

If training your dog is hard in a particular location (and for most people walking outdoors is the dog’s domain therefore they often don’t listen to owners), work on it away from this location until your dog responds. Then gradually move away from your comfort zone. With a young dog it can take time to get the walks happening the way you’d like them to. And some events eg. seeing a cat, may make even the best trained dogs pull on the lead.

Angelique

Is this a normal thing? Or am I not doing something right?

Dr Jo

Most owners find walking their dog quite difficult especially when they are young.

Angelique

When I have her off the lead, she loves it and walks next to me and doesn’t stop. If I run, she runs too but on the lead she won’t run with me…, very strange.

Dr Jo

It is difficult to match paces when on a lead. There is also no option for escape which makes it a daunting experience for some dogs.

Angelique

She has also recently learnt how to climb up and down stairs so that we can go for walks. At times though. I still have to wait there and convince her to come down them or up them (6levels) and so I can’t ever be in a rush.

Dr Jo

Check that she is not sore when walking up and dwon stairs and make it as enticing as possible.

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 24, 2010 | 0 | A++++ Watching Charlie The Pup Grow, Puppies

Update on Charlie the Puppy – Advice from dogLOGIC (Dog Trainers)

I have been keen to find out how young Charlie the pup has been going. Angelique, her owner, has sent the following update so we’ve checked in with Dr Joanne Righetti and Trudi to help with some expert behavioural and puppy training tips and advice based on some current concerns. All puppy owners will benefit from their expert advice. Today, hear from Trudi at dogLOGIC – tomorrow, we’ll hear Dr Joanne Righetti’s thoughts.

Angelique:

Charlies doing well. She’s 15 weeks now. She’s finished puppy school but I’d like her to go to obedience training with the girls at dogLOGIC in a little while”.

She still gets car sick in the back…. I’ve had her in the front with me now or a passenger for a while to get her over the car sickness and enjoy the car trips in general which she does now but I have to put her In a capsule eventually for safety…. I just got one delivered but haven’t tried it out and not sure if it’s suitable but that would have to be in the front seat so she’s not vomiting.

Trudi - dogLOGIC:
Puppies often grow out of car sickness with time, so it’s best to persevere.  Dogs are now required by law to travel in the back seat of the car and not impede in any way on the driver.  It is up to the discretion of the Police officers as to whether or not they believe the dog to be a distraction or a danger and if so, the driver will incur both a fine and a loss of demerit points.  Also, if your car is fitted with airbags and they are activated whilst Charlie is in the front seat, there is a high likelihood of her being killed by the airbag.  The capsule sounds like a great idea but it is important to habituate Charlie to the capsule before putting her in it in the car so that she enjoys being in it before you even use it in the car.  She needs to feel safe and happy inside it so that it doesn’t add to the anxiety of the car sickness whilst travelling.

Angelique:

Her toilet training is going well, she basically goes outside now and that’s great…. She stands at the door if it’s closed and I let her out so very proud of that….. She still bites hands and tries biting other dogs legs thinking she’s playing but I can’t seem to break this habit…. I intervene and she stops but she just does it again out of habit and excitement….
Mouthing is a natural puppy behaviour and they usually grow out of it at around 5-6 months.  This is a behaviour that needs to be managed rather than trained.  Mouthing is Charlie’s way of interacting with you and other dogs.  She doesn’t have hands so she grabs a hold with her mouth.  If you reprimand her for mouthing, she will likely associate the reprimand with the fact that she is interacting with you NOT the fact that we find the behaviour inappropriate.  There are a number of ways that you can manage mouthing; play calmly with her and don’t hype her up, if you play rough with her this will increase her excitement level and encourage the mouthing behaviour. Grab a toy and play with her, if she’s on the end of a toy she’s not on the end of you!  Get a ball and roll it slowly across the floor, puppies love movement and if she’s going after the ball, she’s not going after you!  Distract her with something interesting like an empty tissue box or the inside cardboard roll of the toilet paper, if she’s chewing on a box she’s not chewing on you!  Another thing you can do is create a “time out” area for her to go into.  Put her in there with a chew and some toys to keep her occupied so that she has some own time.  Unlike children, a time out area is not an area where she goes to think about what she’s done wrong – nor is it a punishment spot, it is simply a place to put her to give YOU some time out from her where she can calm down.  This should always be made to be a positive place.

Angelique:
I’m trying to get her used to the lead….. She’s had her final vaccination so this week she has been out every day exploring the street, walking, smelling the plants, the grass, the flowers, everything basically….. A walk down the street takes about 2 hours…… She walks a little with the lead, then stops, smells things…. I try to say” come on Charlie, this way” but she is stubborn and decides she doesn’t want to walk…. I’ve been told it’s ok to drag them but then I feel terrible doing it as I’m worried it hurts them or people may think I’m nasty…..

Trudi – dogLOGIC:


Whatever you do, DON’T force or drag her!  She is just a baby and needs to be able to explore the outside world.  All of the smells, sights and sounds are new and interesting and she needs to be able to investigate them at her own pace.  It’s not so important just now for her to walk in a matter of fact, functional way, it is more important that she builds her confidence in new surroundings so that she becomes desensitised to noises and movement and anything else the outside world throws at her.  Take your time with her on lead, allow her to get used to being on it in a positive way.  If she does stop and doesn’t want to move forward, firstly loosen up on the lead and try to encourage her along using a squeaky toy or maybe a food treat. Dragging her will only make the whole walking process unpleasant for her and can even lead to her not wanting to go for a walk at all.

 Angelique:

She’s in a harness when I walk her with the lead so she doesn’t hurt her neck from pulling.

Trudi – dogLOGIC:


A harness is good but better may be a Front Attach Harness.  These harnesses fit like a normal one, but the lead attaches to the front of the harness at the chest of the dog.  They are really great for pullers and work with the dog’s “opposition reflex” (pulling forward or backward into the lead) and assists in teaching the dog to loose lead walk.

Angelique:

I get her to stop and sit at each gutter to try and get her used to stopping at the road but when I say “go” or come on Charlie, she pulls that face, takes a stance and doesn’t want to walk so I have to drag her as I don’t want her stopping in the middle of the road….. So I’m battling a little with the lead training and street walking….. She knows the biscuit thing now so that doesn’t work putting that near her nose…., I take her squeaky toy with me and that works at times but not always….. Basically I have to walk and stop, walk and stop until she’s ready to continue walking…..

Is this a normal thing? Or am I not doing something right?

Trudi – dogLOGIC:
The stopping and starting is usually as a direct result of the dragging.  Try upping the anti with food and take bbq chicken with you.  Make sure you cross the road where you can do so with plenty of time so that you don’t need to drag. Encourage her to move with you and make sure that you don’t put ANY pressure on that lead.  If you can’t lure her forward with the chicken, drop some on the ground in front of her to get her up and moving.  Take your time working with her on the lead – it may take some time, but getting it right will be SO worth it in the long run. If she just won’t move forward, just whilst you’re training her pick her up and walk across the rest of the road to avoid dragging at all costs.

Angelique:
When I have her off the lead, she loves it and walks next to me and doesn’t stop…. If I run, she runs too but on the lead she won’t run with me…, very strange…..

Trudi – dogLOGIC:
This is once again as a direct result of dragging her.  Take your time and she will eventually run, walk, and trot beside you on lead. And be careful with having her off lead near roads whilst she still a baby. Whilst she may be glued to you at the moment it won’t be long before the big wide world starts to look more exciting and she may run off to check out a smell or try to cross a busy road to chase something on the other side.

Angelique:
She has also recently learnt how to climb up and down stairs so that we can go for walks….. At times though…. I still have to wait there and convince her to come down them or up them (6levels) and so I can’t ever be in a rush……

Trudi – dogLOGIC:

Don’t rush her, she will get better and faster with time.  Once again, use a high value treat to encourage her along.  In all cases, encouraging and positively rewarding the behaviours you want and like will be a lot more effective than forcing her into doing them.  Be patient and calm with her to encourage confidence in all situations and there will be no stopping you!

Angelique:


Hopefully this will just improve……

that’s pretty much the update really…. She seems to be going well….. She’s a lot of joy really and very cute

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 23, 2010 | 0 | A++++ Watching Charlie The Pup Grow, Puppies, Training

Meet Trudi from dogLOGIC Training

If you’re a regular to dogsandcats you will know that we have recently started following Charlie, a Toy Poodle puppy. 

We want to ensure Angelique, as a new puppy owner, has access to expert information as she brings up her gorgeous pup, Charlie. We’ve set up a collaboration between Glen Kolenc the vet, Joanne Righetti the pet behavioural expert and more recently with Trudi and Julie the dog trainers from dogLOGIC.

 dog-training-sydney

Photo: Julie and Trudi from dogLOGIC and their friends

I wanted to introduce you to Trudi and find out all about dogLOGIC so I’ve asked her some questions. :

 Q1 – How did you become involved in dog training?

Dogs were a childhood passion that I never grew out of!  I started out with Border Collies when I was 12 years old, was competition trialling by 13 yrs, conformation showing by 14 yrs and by 15 years old I was breeding with my own kennel prefix. I was also instructing competition obedience with the Northern Suburbs dog training club. All up I have been training dogs now for 31 years or so.

Q2 – When did you start dogLogic?

I started dogLOGIC in 2000.  Julie joined me in 2005.

Q3 – What about Julie? How did you two end up working together?

We met in an outdoor cafe 9 years ago. I was sitting there with my dogs and Jules just happened to be walking past.  She couldn’t (and still can’t) walk past a dog without greeting them so she stopped to say hi to my dogs and we got chatting.  We discovered we had a lot in common when it came to dogs and training and the rest is history.

Q4 – What type of training techniques do you advocate? And why?

I am a positive reinforcement trainer, BUT I come from a traditional training background (check or choker chains, aversive methods etc), so I am fully aware of the mind-set that is associated with traditional training techniques. Methods of dog training have evolved over the years as we have come to better understand how dogs learn, act and behave.  Dogs are opportunists (just like us) so if a behaviour works for them, they are more inclined to repeat the behaviour, whereas if a behaviour doesn’t work for them it will diminish over time. Therefore, positively reinforcing a behaviour that you want or like actively encourages the dog to repeat those behaviours. It is also quick and effective!

Q5 – Do you train dogs in groups or individually?

Both.  We do Private Consults as well as run group courses.  The courses we cover are Puppy Pre-School, Pet Dog Manners and a more advanced course called Beyond Manners.

Q6 – What are the benefits of each?

With the Private Consults, we go to the person’s home.  These sessions are very specific and target the individual problems that people may be having with their dogs.  We specialise in devising and implementing individual behaviour strategies based on a combination of the dog, it’s breed, the problem, the owners, their routines etc. 

The classes that we run are more generic in structure and cover everything from how dogs think and learn to all of the basics like sit, drop, coming when called etc.

Q7 – Can you teach an old dog new tricks?

Absolutely!  No dog is ever too old to stop learning.

Q8 – Is it only dogs you train or do you train other animal species also?

It’s only dogs that we train professionally, however I also own 2 pet rats and a cockatiel all of which I have trained to do various different things.  Both the rats are clicker trained and I have taught the bird how to talk and whistle different tunes.  They all come out of their cages of an evening and interact with us for a couple of hours – it’s very cool.

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 13, 2010 | 1 | A++++ Watching Charlie The Pup Grow, Training

Charlie Le Model..

I just had to share these model shots of Charlie the puppy.. is someone looking a bit spoiled? We share some of her recent outfits..

37409_10150186979805162_823945161_13128785_3283345_s

37409_10150186979820162_823945161_13128786_7825028_n

37409_10150186979830162_823945161_13128787_7217907_n

37409_10150186979835162_823945161_13128788_8282424_n

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jun 25, 2010 | 0 | A++++ Watching Charlie The Pup Grow, Dog clothing, Puppies

Charlie the Puppy – Expert Advice On How To Manage Puppy Car Sickness

35863_10150189828320162_823945161_13227711_3145790_n

Poor Charlie has been experiencing car sickness.. We asked our experts – pet  behaviorist Dr Joanne Righetti and vet, Dr Glen Kolenc what to do.

Dr Jo said:

Car sickness is common, especially in young dogs. It is always wise to check with your vet that all is well before you attempt any behavioural therapy.

Sickness may be caused or intensified by anxiety. Dogs can get anxious, not because they are nervous of cars (although some may be) but because excitement builds up prior to and on their journey. If we can desensitise them to this, then we will help them cope.

Desensitisation involves short journeys and sometimes no journeys at all. Take your dog out to the car, sit there, then go back home *without going anywhere). Next time do the same but turn on the engine. Then drive down the street. Gradually increase your journeys. Keep an eye on your dog’s behaviour and if she is starting to salivate or become restless, you may have pushed things too far, too soon. Go back a step.

As well as desensitisation, you can give your dog some ginger. Check with your vet, however, prior to doing so. Lavender around the car can also help. Dog appeasing pheromone (DAP), available form your vet has also been shown to be helpful with car sickness so spray some around your vehicle.

If your dog is sick, deal with it with the minimum of fuss, otherwise you may reinforce the behaviour. Chances are she will grow out of it and we hope sooner rather than later :)

Dr Glen says:

Fortunately car sickness in puppies generally does not present too serious a problem. Most puppies will grow out if it fairly quickly.

Until they do, the main thing is to make sure they haven’t eaten within 2 hours of going in the car (if it is possible to plan for this). For pups that get bad car sickness, some preventative medication is available at vets which is very effective in stopping the vomiting.

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jun 23, 2010 | 0 | A++++ Watching Charlie The Pup Grow, Puppies

Charlie the Puppy – Puppies Relating to Older Dogs

Charlie playing with Sasha

Charlie playing with Sasha

We’ve been keeping track of little Charlie the puppy and answering questions as they arise for Angelique, who has never raised a pup before.

In collaboration with Dr Glen Kolenc the vet, animal behaviourist Dr Joanne Righetti, Trudi and Julie the dog trainers and us here at dogsandcats.. we hope to not only offer Angelique professional advice – but also help puppy owners around the world..

Today it’s about how a puppy behaves and plays with other dogs.

“Charlie’s been playing with another the toy poodle, Sasha.  Charlie tends to try and jump on her and bite her. This worries me as if she does that to other bigger dogs, they might attack her She is lucky that Sasha is gentle with her and they do enjoy playing together, Angelique said.

Dr Jo, animal behaviourist, offers the following advice:
This is normal puppy behaviour and most well-socialised adult dogs will put up with it, until the puppy is around six  months old. Even then they tend to communicate gently, through postures and gestures, when they have had enough puppy antics.

You should not allow too much rough play to go on, especially if one dog is becoming hurt or feeling intimidated by the other. Take charge and direct your pup’s energy on to a more appropriate game.

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jun 17, 2010 | 0 | A++++ Watching Charlie The Pup Grow, dog behavior, Tips

Charlie The Puppy And Retrieiving

31948_10150169426285162_823945161_12596404_1782070_n

The playful Charlie apparently loves getting leaves and eating them or bringing them inside and hiding them.  Charlie’s really settling into her new home and this cute little habit has just began recently.

I always check in with Dr Joanne Righetti, animal behaviorist when I get updates about Charlie and Jo said:

” Cute – encourage this retrieving instinct by throwing toys and giving a reward for their return.”

Stay tuned to hear more about Charlie as she grows.

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jun 16, 2010 | 0 | A++++ Watching Charlie The Pup Grow