Archives for Training category

Down Boy! Stopping Your Boisterous Dog From Jumping

By Carol Hobbs

If you have ever walked into your friend’s house and at the door you get pounced on by a dog, then you probably know how annoying it feels. If you are dressed for an evening out and you go to your date’s house to pick him up and get jumped on and pawed by his dog, wouldn’t that make you mad? It is important as a dog owner to actively train your dog so that it does not jump on people when they walk into your house. Many people consider this a normal doggie behavior but as a cautionary measure, you should properly train your dog because you never know how an individual will react when a dog instantly pounces on him.

The effect is more tremendous if the victim involved is a child, an elderly person or a person who is handicapped. A child or a person who is handicapped can easily lose grip when pounced on by a dog and end up falling down and even if they don’t fall they are likely to be scared and upset by the situation, something definitely to be avoided.

If you have a dog, then the question should be why does it jump? To answer this, you should know that the three main reasons that may lead a dog to jump include excitement by the dog, a dog looking for attention and lastly a dog that is aggressive in nature will generally jump on people.

As a way of getting your dog to stop jumping, you need to take your dog through obedience training. The training requires that you come up with commands to effectively control your dog’s behavior. Among the commands you can come up with are commands like “sit” and “stop.” These commands will help you control your dog’s behavior anytime someone walks through your door.

There are other ways of ensuring your dog is well mannered if after training it has not yet grasped the commands or you have not yet started training it. Among the ways you can use include lifting up your knee whenever your dog begins to jump on you. This will act as a blockage preventing your dog from actually reaching on you. In case you are not good at balancing and you need to prevent your dog from jumping on you, you can simply turn your body away from the dog. You can continuously ignore your dog anytime it tries jumping on you until the dog stops jumping on you.

Once your dog changes its behavior and stops jumping on people, you can pet him and show him attention. By doing this, your dog will understand that he is only given attention when he stops jumping on people and so it will refrain from jumping on people.

If after trying all the possible solutions you still cannot control your dog from jumping on people, then you should think about using a choke collar. You can use a choke collar together with a leash. Every time your dog shows a behavior that is unacceptable, then all you need to do is give the leash a tug. Keep in mind that the main reason for using the choke collar is to control the dog’s behavior and not to hurt the dog. This measure will completely deter your dog from ever jumping on people.

The important points that you need not forget when dealing with a jumping dog include breaking this jumping habit immediately when your dog displays it and keeping in mind that dog obedience training session does not give instant results and so you should never give up on the training.

As a lasting solution, you should at no time give a treat to your dog in attempt to preventing it from jumping on guests. Some dog owners make this mistake and the dog gets different signals on how it should behave. You should be consistent on how you treat your dog and on the manner in which you reward it based on specific behaviors it shows. With this under consideration, then you should know that dog jumping is an easy habit to deal with if you use the right training. Patience, time and reinforcement are all you need and you will get your dog behaving in a good way.

To learn the basic and advanced training techniques used by professional dog trainers for free. Visit KnowYourDog.org

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carol_Hobbs

Randa

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Jul 07, 2012 | 0 | Training

Down Boy! Stopping Your Boisterous Dog From Jumping

By Carol Hobbs

If you have ever walked into your friend’s house and at the door you get pounced on by a dog, then you probably know how annoying it feels. If you are dressed for an evening out and you go to your date’s house to pick him up and get jumped on and pawed by his dog, wouldn’t that make you mad? It is important as a dog owner to actively train your dog so that it does not jump on people when they walk into your house. Many people consider this a normal doggie behavior but as a cautionary measure, you should properly train your dog because you never know how an individual will react when a dog instantly pounces on him.

The effect is more tremendous if the victim involved is a child, an elderly person or a person who is handicapped. A child or a person who is handicapped can easily lose grip when pounced on by a dog and end up falling down and even if they don’t fall they are likely to be scared and upset by the situation, something definitely to be avoided.

If you have a dog, then the question should be why does it jump? To answer this, you should know that the three main reasons that may lead a dog to jump include excitement by the dog, a dog looking for attention and lastly a dog that is aggressive in nature will generally jump on people.

As a way of getting your dog to stop jumping, you need to take your dog through obedience training. The training requires that you come up with commands to effectively control your dog’s behavior. Among the commands you can come up with are commands like “sit” and “stop.” These commands will help you control your dog’s behavior anytime someone walks through your door.

There are other ways of ensuring your dog is well mannered if after training it has not yet grasped the commands or you have not yet started training it. Among the ways you can use include lifting up your knee whenever your dog begins to jump on you. This will act as a blockage preventing your dog from actually reaching on you. In case you are not good at balancing and you need to prevent your dog from jumping on you, you can simply turn your body away from the dog. You can continuously ignore your dog anytime it tries jumping on you until the dog stops jumping on you.

Once your dog changes its behavior and stops jumping on people, you can pet him and show him attention. By doing this, your dog will understand that he is only given attention when he stops jumping on people and so it will refrain from jumping on people.

If after trying all the possible solutions you still cannot control your dog from jumping on people, then you should think about using a choke collar. You can use a choke collar together with a leash. Every time your dog shows a behavior that is unacceptable, then all you need to do is give the leash a tug. Keep in mind that the main reason for using the choke collar is to control the dog’s behavior and not to hurt the dog. This measure will completely deter your dog from ever jumping on people.

The important points that you need not forget when dealing with a jumping dog include breaking this jumping habit immediately when your dog displays it and keeping in mind that dog obedience training session does not give instant results and so you should never give up on the training.

As a lasting solution, you should at no time give a treat to your dog in attempt to preventing it from jumping on guests. Some dog owners make this mistake and the dog gets different signals on how it should behave. You should be consistent on how you treat your dog and on the manner in which you reward it based on specific behaviors it shows. With this under consideration, then you should know that dog jumping is an easy habit to deal with if you use the right training. Patience, time and reinforcement are all you need and you will get your dog behaving in a good way.

To learn the basic and advanced training techniques used by professional dog trainers for free. Visit KnowYourDog.org

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Carol_Hobbs

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Jul 01, 2012 | 0 | Tips, Training

Some Tips To Help Train Your Dog Out Of His Separation Anxiety

By Sari Crossman

Because dogs are pack animals, they are genetically predisposed to be highly social. This is part of the reason that most dogs bond so well with their owners and want to always be at their side. Unfortunately, most owners have to leave their dogs at some time during the day either to go to work or just to the grocery store. Some dogs experience tremendous separation anxiety when their owner goes away and can show some very destructive behavior because of it.

Most people like to think that their dog just lies peacefully on the couch and waits patiently for their return whenever they go out. The fact of the matter is that most dogs will experience some degree of separation anxiety. This may be expressed in the form of repetitive barking or crying which may be disturbing for your neighbors if you live in an apartment. If your dog typically likes to chew on toys, you may return home to discover that he has chewed up your favorite pair of shoes or even part of your sofa!

This doggie behavior can cause tremendous anxiety for owners as they flounder around trying to find solutions. There are some tried and true methods to help train your dog out of his separation anxiety that will work relatively quickly if you are consistent with them.

Help your dog relax before you get ready to leave the house

One of the best ways to ensure that your dog will remain calm when you leave the house is to tire him out. If he is tired enough when you leave, chances are he will just lie down on his bed and go to sleep. A vigorous walk or an extended game of “fetch” in the park will give him some exercise and tire him out. Exercising your dog will allow him to burn off some energy that might otherwise be channeled into chewing up the cushions on your couch.

Try to get home at lunchtime to exercise your dog

If it’s at all possible, try to steal a little bit of time on your lunch break to go home and be with your dog. You can get him out for a quick walk and spend some quality time with him. This will help teach him that even though you do go away, you always come back. If you aren’t able to get back home at lunchtime, consider hiring a dog walker to come in and get your dog out so he will have a break and have a chance to relieve himself. There are often neighborhood looking for odd jobs and this kind of job is perfect for them.

Buy some toys for your dog that will challenge him

Many dogs act out because they are extremely bored when their owners aren’t around, not just because of separation anxiety. Be sure to always leave your dog’s favorite toy for him to play with while you are gone. There are also many other kinds of toys that will challenge his mind such as food balls which are stuffed with food. The dog has to roll the ball which will then release one piece of food at a time. A kong toy which can be stuffed with peanut butter and bacon bits is also a great diversionary toy for a dog. They will spend hours licking the toy to get at the peanut butter stuffed inside.

Another companion dog might or might not help

Many dog owners rashly think that getting another dog that will keep their dog company is the best solution. Sometimes this will work, sometimes, it will simply add to the problem and make it worse. There are a number of issues you must consider before introducing another dog to your home such as your dog’s breed, size and temperament. Your veterinarian might be able to advise you about whether or not he or she thinks your dog will be able to adapt to a new dog in the house. You want to avoid a situation in which your first dog is fighting with a new dog and you have to re-home to new dog after just a short period of time.

Some tips to get your dog ready for your departure

To desensitize your dog to your departure and his separation anxiety, practice leaving your dog for short periods of time. Go out the door and go several feet away from the house or apartment door. Wait to see if he starts barking. If he does not, re-enter the house or apartment. Do not greet your dog when you go in. Act as if everything is completely but give him a dog treat and praise him for being quiet. Try to vary your routine prior to leaving so that you do not give unconscious signals to your dog which will tell him that you are getting ready to go. Do not make a big fuss over the fact that you will be leaving. Just say, “stay here and be good!” and go out the door.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sari_Crossman

Randa

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May 02, 2012 | 0 | dog behavior, Training, Understanding Your Dog

What Are the Basics of Clicker Training For Dogs?

By Jerry I Patterson

Opposed to what some people know, clicker training for dogs has long been an established way for good dog training. It is not just effective but also a caring way that anyone can learn. Clicker training has been used by numerous animal trainers because of its efficiency; and is not just limited for use with dogs but also other animals like cats, tigers, dolphins, and horses. Teach your pet dogs through clicker training and end up with well-behaved pets in no time.

Requirements

First and foremost, clicker training needs a clicker to be used. Food bits or soft dog treats are also necessary.

Operation

Clickers make for a useful way of conditioning pets in carrying out behaviors. This process is what we call “shaping” and is done by positive strengthening. Or simply, rewarding a pet for whatever good behavior it exhibited. This, however, is not to be considered as bribing since the treats will be taken gradually away to pave way for the clicker sound becoming the reward. It is functional since it informs the dogs that they displayed proper behavior at the exact time without them ending angry, tired, or upset. Clicker training enables you to reach and communicate with your dog. Just remember to limit sessions to at most 15 minutes per day to give enough item for your dog to comprehend on what it has learned.

Getting acquainted with the clicker

Firstly, you need to associate your clicker to positive consequence. If not, the clicker will wind up being a disregarded sound. For you to succeed, you will have to use small food pieces like cheese, sausages, and other doggie treats. They have to be really minute to provide a delicious-tasting reward and not fill the dog up. Start off by putting some pieces on the ground. As your dog starts to eat them, just push the clicker and say nothing. Repeat this for a couple of times and your pet will associate the clicking sound as a reward indicator. Test whether the pet have understood by waiting until it stops looking for foods, and you just say nothing except clicking. If it looks towards you, throw a piece down. If not, repeat the steps until it comes to a point where it looks at you after clicking.

Incorporating the commands

Now that the sound is familiar to the dog, teaching basic commands should commence. To teach your dog when to sit, start indoors first and command your pet to “sit”. Wait for the time that it sits and immediately click the device while you hand it a piece of treat. Repeat this step until such a time that when you say “sit” and click, your dog immediately sits down. Then start off by commanding to sit first and patiently wait for the dog to sit by itself. When the dog does sit, click the device and hand over another treat. It may take time to become familiar with the command but just continue repeating so. Slowly diminish the reward as you realize how your dog begins sitting right away after saying the command. You can also use other commands like “stand”, “shake”, “fetch” when teaching your dogs through clicker training.

Learn more about the benefits of clicker training. Or find answers to your dog training problems online now.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jerry_I_Patterson

Randa

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Apr 27, 2012 | 0 | Training

Why Does Conditioning Work for Some Dogs and Not Others?

By Dale McCluskey

If you reinforce behavior that you want than it will likely happen again. This is one of the mission statements that aligns with learning theory / conditioning and the treat trainers. I go further and ask the questions What is motivating and influencing the dog’s mind? What type of influence is happening between the dog and owner? When behavior issues and problems fail to go away what is really happening? Of course my entire system of training is built from the ground up based on answering these questions. It is also based on the fact that the type of connection happening between dogs and owners is much deeper and more profound than many suspect, understand or realize. When you start to pin these ideas down and perform the litmus test they break down and fail at certain points with a certain percentage of dogs and owners.

While counter conditioning may establish a different dot to how the dog perceives the mail man it may not fix the overall relationship with your dog. If the roles fail to change it is like plugging the hole in the front of your sinking boat with one finger while two more holes are leaking in the back. I clearly show that there is a minimum 30 – 40 percent failure rate happening within many of these weak and permissive systems that elevate and promote these ideas. This begs the question as to what is the real standard and what qualifies as success? I clearly show that it often is not going through the motions of obedience class. Many dogs will move around for motivating agents and established associations while remaining firmly locked within the leader role. Many dog trainers are unable to qualify the type of influence taking hold within their learning models. Not to brag but I am probably one of first trainers who can break this mess apart and show the break down points via the shared connection and interplay of the psychology. And make no mistake, it is a mess.

When assessing the success rate of any system of training you must look at the psychology and connection being promoted. Certain ideas represent the type of risk factor that is present. When you are looking for an example of what is happening within the dog training world you need to look no further than parenting. The permissive dynamic is the real problem in society when it comes to the psychology and connection involved. If you are seeking a path of training which is going to conform to how you want to think, even while you are sinking, there are lots out there.

This system of training goes beyond the surface to create meaningful and lasting results for dogs and owners.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Dale_McCluskey

Randa

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Apr 24, 2012 | 0 | dog behavior, Training

Puppy Training – Toilet Training Your Puppy

By Al Murray

Toilet training your puppy is a necessity to avoid unwanted mishaps around the house. Toilet training your puppy involves marking a designated spot, usually the garden, that your puppy should use for the toilet.

Every dog should be taught household manners as soon as they enter the house, They need to know where they can and cannot go to relief themselves. As with any form of dog training, successful toilet training requires patience, consistency and reward.

Tips for Toilet Training a Puppy

  • Start the moment you get your puppy home for the first time. Head immediately for the garden, wait until your puppy has had a pee or defecated, and praise them for doing well. Your puppy has probably had a long journey home and this offers a perfect opportunity to start setting the ground rules.
  • Take your puppy to the garden after feeding. Eating stimulates the digestive system of a puppy and they will need to go within 20 minutes of eating.
  • Reward, but never punish your puppy. When they get it right, be sure to offer plenty of praise and a dog treat to encourage them to do the same behaviour more often. Let them know that they have done well and you are very proud of them.
  • Use a cue word whilst your puppy relieves themselves. This cue word will become associated with the action so that you can prompt your puppy when you want them to go.
  • Stick to a routine. Getting into a good routine is essential for successful toilet training. Take your puppy outside first thing in the morning, after feeding and regularly throughout the day if possible.
  • Look for signs of when they want to go. Learning your pets habits will help greatly in spotting this signs. Puppies have weak bladders and will only offer a small window for you to successfully get them outside.

Common Puppy Toilet Training Mistakes

Be sure not to make any of the following toilet training mistakes. A consistent training routine is an effective one.

  • Punishing your puppy. Never punish your puppy if they relieve themselves in the house. Hitting your pet or rubbing their nose in their mess will undo any good training you have been doing.
  • Feed your puppy regularly using good quality dog food. A poor diet and irregular feeding pattern can make it difficult to keep to a routine.
  • Don’t wait for your puppy to give you the signs that they need to go. You will be more successful by catching it before it happens by taking them outside regularly. Be sure to reward immediately after they are done,
  • Excitement can lead to your puppy losing control of their bladder. If this happens try and hide your own excitement of seeing your best friend until after you have taken them outside and they have relieved themselves.
  • Be sure that the household use the same cue word for when they go to the toilet. Different messages can confuse your puppy and lead to ineffective training.
  • Don’t be lazy. Stick to your routine. The results of having a well mannered and controlled pet will be worth all the hard work.

Following the puppy toilet training tips listed above, and avoiding the common mistakes, will ensure that your puppy will know where they should be going to do their business before long. And you will be glad you made the effort.

Check out my website for more information on caring for your basset hound puppy. Owning a puppy for the first time can be overwhelming and tiring. Make sure you have everything you need for your puppy.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Al_Murray

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Apr 03, 2012 | 0 | Puppies, Training

Training Your Dog Not To Bite With 3 Preventative Training Techniques

By Lawrence K Gibson

It would probably break your heart if you found out that your dog bit you or anyone else. You would probably feel bad and possibly be facing a lawsuit. Who wants to deal with the stress of this possibility? Chances are you will if training your dog not to bite isn’t apart of his training. Below you’ll find 3 techniques to ensure you don’t have to deal with anything like that.

Before I give you the 3 techniques let’s cover a little dog 101 stuff.

Training your dog not to bite is best achieved while he is still a puppy. The earlier the better. Be mindful of what games you play with him and the scenarios you put him in. Some situations put your dog at an increased risk of biting someone.

Apart of your dog’s natural behavior is to be aggressive. It’s your job as the owner to curb these natural behaviors. Let it be known early in your dog’s life right and wrong behavior. Without further ado, here are the 3 techniques.

Technique #1 – No Hitting And/Or Yelling

For a lot of us, if someone hits you, the tendency is to hit the person back. This is easily the case when you hit your dog. If you hit your dog he may feel the need to defend himself. This means he will be in defense mode because he feels threatened.

At this point he will try to either bark or much worse, bite. If this action and reaction persists, you now have a serious behavior pattern to break. Your dog may feel that if he gets yelled at, if there are loud sudden noises, someone hits him, or even gets in a position he may perceive as someone getting ready to hit him, he should bite.

Technique#2 – Stay Away From Tug Of War

Tug of war is a game of aggression and territory. It’s a game to see who will triumph over the other. This means that you very well can be teaching your dog to show his dominance over you. Stay away from this game as it teaches your dog to growl and be territorial. Your dog DOES NOT need to be growling at you.

Technique#3 – Don’t Allow Biting

Biting is a behavior your puppy learned when first born. He most likely played with his brothers and sisters this way. It will be your dog’s natural inclination to play this biting game with you too. This is what you do to break him out of biting with you and your family members.

It must be clear that you will not tolerate any biting or else he loses out on playtime. Next time you’re playing with him and he decides to bite make a “yelp” sound like a dog would. Do this regardless of if it hurt or not. Then, turn your back to him and ignore him for maybe a minute. Don’t do it too long as puppies are easily distracted.

Training your dog not to bite is best achieved by keeping it simple and staying consistent. You may also be interested in learning how to solve some common dog training problems that dog owners face. Click here ~~> http://www.DogTrainingSoSimple.com to learn more about dog training tips that are simple, fun, and FREE to implement.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lawrence_K_Gibson

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Feb 03, 2012 | 0 | Tips, Training

How to Get Rid of Your Dog’s Aggressive Behavior

By Noel Guntan

Having a pet dog is an exciting and fun hobby for its owner. Dogs are naturally close to human beings. Lovable pets that dogs are, they show so much loyalty to their owners and in fact, cases are known where dogs save their owners from untoward incidents, sometimes even to the point of sacrificing their own lives. There is a truth to the saying that “A dog is a man’s best friend.”

Raising and caring for your pet dog are in some ways similar to raising your own kid. Your pet needs your time, attention, provision for material needs, and yes, it needs your love, too! You can expect your dog to show emotions such as joy, excitement, and sadness. Your pet is sensitive to its immediate environment just as much as you are!

There are times that it may show an undesirable behavior. It doesn’t mean, however, that it is what your dog wants to show or do. You can actually control your dogs behavior when it shows undesirable traits or do unwanted actions.

In agility trainings, for example, the crowd and the intensity of agility sport can cause your pet so much excitement and stimulation. Such stimulation may cause it to be restless and begin exhibiting undesirable behaviors ranging from being reactive to its handler and being rude to other dogs. In such a case, what steps can you take to control your dog’s behavior?

Here are simple, easy-to-do steps to correct your dog’s attitude:

1. WORK OUT A CONSISTENT PLAN TO AVOID YOUR DOG REPEATING AN UNWANTED BEHAVIOR.
Show your pet that you do not approve of that particular behavior, otherwise, when it repeats the same, it will become more intense. If you are in a crowded agility training and your pet starts to show an unwanted behavior, take your it away from that environment to a calmer place. Sometimes, a training environment can be stressful and ca cause cause your pet to be highly reactive. Before going to such trainings, make sure that you have a place where you can take your it in case its level of stimulation needs to be reduced. A good way of controlling your its behavior is by training it to perform “sit-stay” behind you. In cases of high reactivity, you can then move in front of your dog to manage the situation while your it stays safely behind you.

2. USE THE MARK & REWARD PROCESS.
By using the mark and reward process, you can teach your pet an alternate to its undesirable behavior. The trick is to train your it to keep its mind focused on a task and its consequent reward. A dog that has its mind so focused will not be reactive and can in fact ignore its immediate environment to accomplish its task. For example, if your dogs starts to get irritable and begin growling at nearby dogs settled on their crates, train your dog to heel past the crates while keeping its attention to you.

3. DESENSITIZE YOUR DOG.
In cases where your dog reacts violently to other dogs, hold its leash tightly and abruptly pull away. This action will send your dog a message that you do not approve of its behavior.

4. TRAIN YOUR DOG IN IDENTIFYING STRESS SIGNALS.
Train your dog to take note of your stress signals and to give you automatic eye contact once you give these signals. Examples of such a signal are grabbing your dog’s muzzle or collar, pulling tight the leash, or speaking more loudly. Gradually train your dog to understand the meaning of each signal. Be sure to use the principle of mark and reward process as you teach your dog the meaning of each stress signal. For example, to change the meaning of each stress signal, do it gradually in the company of your dog, clicking and feeding it as you give out your signal.

5. TRAIN YOUR DOG TO REACT CORRECTLY TO YOUR STRESS SIGNALS.
Teach your dog to respond correctly to the stress signals that you give. For example, let’s take the tight leash. Let your dog go to the leash’ end and step backwards a bit. when the leash get’s taut, click and feed your dog. Allow your dog to go to you for its reward and spend about twenty minutes praising your dog. Repeat this training many times. After this step, stand in another place and pull the dog’s leash. Reward your dog by clicking and feeding for making the leash loose by coming towards you. Gradually increase the leash’ tightness and alternate between taking steps and standing still. While doing this training, reinforce every eye contact that occurs. When your dog gets to notice the tightening of its leash, it will look up to you expecting a reward instead of reacting violently to an approaching dog.

However, if you notice signs of anxiety in your dog as you increase its leash’ tightness, stop the session immediately and evaluate your current training techniques. Review past success level and begin from there. If you find that you dog has taken for a stress signal any other behavior of your own to show aggression, apply the same principles discussed above. You can then change the associated behavior by rewarding your dog with clicking and feeding when you show your stress signals.

6. PROVIDE YOUR PET WITH A DOG TO DOG TRAINING ENCOUNTER.
Teaching your pet how to react properly to another dog is the best way to reduce its behavior of aggression towards another dog, so make every dog to dog encounter an opportunity for training. For instance, you can click and feed your pet every time another dog sniffs at your pet. Doing this regularly will teach your dog to expect a reward from you instead of being aggressive every time another dog approaches.

The best way to do this exercise is with another handler with a non-reactive, stable dog. Give your dog its click and feed reward as the other dog approaches it in semi-circular fashion. Avoid a head to head encounter. Such an encounter is unnatural to dogs and can immediately cause a dogfight.

7. AFTER THE BASIC DOG TO DOG ENCOUNTER, TRAIN YOUR PET WITH A NOSE TO NOSE ENCOUNTER.
When your pet has achieved basic level of tolerance, train it to tolerate other dogs approaching straight to its face. Click and feed your dog as another dog sniffs its tail, doing it with a high rate of reinforcement. Do this every time such interaction occurs. However, if the other dog is food possessive, click and pat your dog instead.

Simultaneously, each handler calls his own dog after a number of repetitions, clicking and feeding after every successful session. Both handlers should agree on a cue to end a session.

Each session should last only for about 5-10 seconds or as long as the dogs stay calm, gradually increasing the length of the session over time. If any of the dog shows undesirable behavior, however, stop the session immediately and evaluate the reason for such behavior.

Doing the above la clicker dog training in a consistent manner will prepare your dog to stay calm even in an intense, stimulating environment such as dog obedience la sessions. The trick is to do the training repeatedly until your dog knows how to expect a reward from you instead of showing an aggressive or reactive behavior.

The authors are writers for Mondex Professionals US.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Noel_Guntan

Randa

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Jan 16, 2012 | 0 | Training

How To Crate Train A Puppy – Don’t Forget These Rules!

By Alyssa Stevens

One of the BIGGEST challenges of owning a puppy is potty training. It’s a huge issue for most dog owners, and if you’re reading this article then I’m sure you’re finding this out the hard way. Am I right?

If you’ve done your research, you know that the first step in this process is crate training. Puppies and dogs both like their sleeping quarters to be clean. In the wild, wolves keep their dens impeccably clean, leaving their “houses” to eliminate outside the den. They don’t like to potty where they sleep! Learning how to crate train a puppy is the first step.

So, as good dog owners we need to replicate this system. We do this by choosing a crate that is big enough to allow the puppy to stand, sit, and turn around in but small enough that he can’t eliminate in a corner and be able to get away from it in the other side of the crate. When you choose the right crate, the process becomes simple. All you’ll need besides the crate is a washable dog bed to keep him comfortable.

But we’re not done yet!

Crate training puppies can be a little more difficult than training fully grown dogs. Older dogs seem to catch on a lot easier. Take my Labrador mix for example! She was nearly a year old when I adopted her and she caught on immediately. Whereas my Pomeranian, who I adopted as a small puppy, was terribly stubborn. Sometimes it just takes puppies longer to understand!

One of the biggest challenges of this process is crate training puppies at night. I hear owners complaining about this ALL the time! Oftentimes new puppies become frightened. Just think about it… they’re in a strange place without their mother or siblings. That’s terribly scary for a little puppy! Crate training puppies at night often comes along with a lot of crying, whimpering, and digging.

In some cases, the whining and crying that comes with crate training puppies at night is just them telling you that they need to go outside. A puppies bladder is not as big as a full grown dog. They simply can’t hold it that long, and until your puppy gets a little older, you may have to sacrifice a little sleep each night to take him or her outside.

In other cases, your puppy may just be crying for attention. This is the downside to crate training puppies. They don’t like to be left alone for long! But your puppy must learn to sleep the night through, and if you want your puppy not to grow up to be spoiled (just like children, spoiled dogs are not nice to be around) then you need to ignore it. If you have to put the crate in another room, then do it. You will be doing more harm than good and reinforcing this bad behavior by catering to your puppy every time he wants out. Eventually he’ll learn that he doesn’t get what he wants (a.k.a. to get out of the crate!) by crying, and he will stop.

Another tip for crate training that I am going to offer up is to stick to a schedule.

At night, before bed, don’t give your puppy food or water after seven o’clock. Take him out right before you go to bed, and make sure you take him IMMEDIATELY outside. If this means picking him up and carrying him to the yard, then do it. If you give him even the slightest chance, he will potty on your favorite rug!

Now that you know how to crate train a puppy, you have the tools you need to continue the training process which will last his whole life. Good luck!

Learn more about the crates and crate training puppies at PetProductsForYou.com. They even have a puppy package which gives you everything you need to get started with the new member of your family. You’ll discover many different of dog crates, all designed to assist you in training your puppy.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Alyssa_Stevens

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Nov 06, 2011 | 0 | Puppies, Training

Play Fun Games To Train Your Dog

By Kay Ringelstetter

Train your dog by playing with him or her. What could be more fun! It will provide mental stimulation and physical exercise for both of you and it is also an excellent way to bond with your dog. You will learn to communicate and work together and have fun doing so.

Playing outdoors in an enclosure where your dog can be off leash is the better choice. However, playing indoors is certainly an acceptable way to play too. Your dog will not care what game you choose, as long as he or she has a chance to run, jump and chase. However there are certainly some favorites that you will both enjoy.

Obedience can be taught to your dog through games. By using simple voice commands along with a unique hand signal specific to that command you can begin and interrupt your play time frequently to help your dog learn. Start with a sit command, using a sharp authoritative tone. Use a unique hand signal specific to the “Sit” command. Once the dog obeys, reward by continuing the play immediately. If not, stop the game abruptly. Turning your back on your pet or putting the leash on and leaving your play area is a very powerful message that your dog will soon begin to understand. Although this may take several attempts at first, soon your dog will learn to pay attention and you will learn to alternate between commands and play time quickly and often. Then you can easily add other commands to your play, such as “Stay”, “Lay” or “Go”. For each game, begin and end with a command, but always finish the session with play.

Here are some old-time favorite games to play with your canine companion:

1) Hide and Seek. Put your dog into a sit or lay position and then command him to stay. Go and hide somewhere and then call your dog’s name. You will both have a lot of fun with this game.

2) Treasure Hunt. Let your dog sniff a treat or toy. Command your dog to sit and stay. Hide the treat/toy and then say “Go” and enjoy the fun as your pet searches for the treasure.

3) Follow Your Leader. Set up a few obstacles in your home and yard and set off as the leader. Enjoy your fun laughing as your canine friend tries to follow you.

4) Fetch. Command your dog to sit and stay. Throw a ball or toy and command your pet to chase it with a “Go” and then return it to you with a “Come”. This may take a bit of repetition and work but the rewards are well worth it. If you are outdoors, you can use a Frisbee and this is loads of fun.

5) Tug-Of-War. All dogs love this game which employs a rope or strong toy. However, you must train your dog to release the rope or toy on command.

There are many other games you can play with your dog, including agility games or maybe teaching them some neat tricks. Our dog was taught to balance a treat on her nose and when we clapped our hands, she threw it into the air and then caught it in her mouth. It was a trick that fascinated everyone, yet was a very simple trick to teach her. We always carried dog treats in our treat bag to be ready at all times.

You will soon come up with many games that you and your dog will enjoy. In addition to that enjoyment, your dog will learn new commands and training techniques in a unique and effective way. It is important that you are consistent in your playtime so that your dog enjoys the physical and mental stimulation constantly needed. In addition, if you are playing outdoors it is also important to always be assisted by your bag for dog to carry your needed essentials.

Consider this unique bag for dog when you play with or train your dog. This handy dog bag can remain attached to your dog leash or moved to your belt or belt loops if you are not using a leash. Your bag will carry everything for you – your dog treats, toys, training supplies, empty and full poop bags, hand sanitizer and much more. Enjoy your playtime and the convenience offered by this great dog bag.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kay_Ringelstetter

Randa

P.S. Don’t forget to visit us at dogs and cats

And you can follow us on twitter too

Oct 27, 2011 | 0 | Training